Genealogy

Marriage Bond Between Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans, Northampton County NC

There wasn’t any extra information, why does this always happen to me?  It reads:

“We, the undersigned, do hereby acknowledge ourselves indebted to his Excellency, Wm Hawkins Esquire, Governer, &c. and his successors office, in the sum of five hundred pounds. But to be void on condition that there is no lawful cause obstruct a marriage between Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans for whom a liceace [?] no issues.

Witness, our hands and seals, this 17th day of Feb A.D. 1814

In presence of Tom Hughes                                             Henry -x- Evans his mark”

 

nancy-evans-marriage-bond-with-stamp
Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans 17 FEB 1814 Northampton County, North Carolina.  Bondsman Henry Evans.  Tom Hughes was a clerk who appears in many marriage records around this time in Northampton County.

 

Genealogy, Uncategorized

Sarah Evans Full Mitochondrial Sequence Match Updated

We finally received a mitochondrial DNA match on October 20th.  This person’s HVR1 and HVR2 results rolled in first, then the next day I was notified that it was a full sequence match!  Here’s a good explanation from Roberta Estes of DNA Explained on why this kind of match is significant: “Locations are extremely important when tracking mitochondrial DNA because if you match someone who is in the same area as your ancestor, then you’re close to finding your common ancestor. The records that may well prove the connection may be located in that geography as well. Some people are lucky enough to connect to a surname. Since they change every generation, the surname will likely be buried in the information of the other individual. You should ask them for their info as well, along with the areas where their ancestor lived. Don’t neglect sisters and who they married. Your ancestor’s sister may hold the key to your ancestry as well. I generally take my matches’ ancestor’s names and compare them to names in my Gedcom file to see what I find. It’s amazing how often I find something close geographically or sometimes I find their ancestor already listed as a sibling or niece or cousin of one of my ancestors. That’s powerful information.”

fms-v7-match-documentation
Our first mitochondrial DNA match. As you all know, I have been stuck on my furthest maternal line ancestor, Sarah Evans for a while. I know Sarah Evans was married to William Brummet in Chariton County, Missouri in 1827 and that the 1850 census for Livingston County, Missouri says she was from North Carolina. I even received a notification as the project administrator for Mothers of Missouri. This was super exciting: They are descendants of Nancy Evans who married Elijah Boon in Northampton County, North Carolina in 1814 before setting off for Missouri. Nancy Evans was born in October 1796 so there would have been about a 13-year gap between her and Sarah Evans. Nancy Evans’ parents were William Evans (sometimes William Evins) and Sarah Hayes. The match does not know Sarah Hayes’ mother.

UPDATE at the bottom, full match confirmed!  Nancy Boon/Nancy Evans and Sarah Brummett/Sarah Evans were sisters!

A cursory Google search for Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans, Missouri turns up this link, a short biography about Mrs. Harriet Bills (Harriet Boone) from the book, The History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri, 1886  mentions her parents “being Elijah and Nancy Boone, nee Evans. They were also both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in Northampton county, December 12, 1796, and by occupation was a farmer. He continued to live in the State of his birth until removing to Livingston county, Mo., in 1834. The mother was born October 12, 1796.”  A few pages before, it mentions William Wm. Brummett and Elijah Boon both living in Township 59, Ranges 24 and 25, respectively.  Our Sarah Evans and her husband William Brummett eventually end up in Livingston County.  This is where their daughter Mary Ann marries James Taylor.

This excerpt from the book History of Chariton and Howard Counties, Missouri page 459 notes Elijah Boone was one of the “old settlers” of Chariton County along with a Brummett.  This would put Elijah and Nancy Boon (Evans), and the Brummett Family in Chariton County prior to 1830.  Remember, Sarah Evans and William Brummett married in 1827 in Chariton County, Missouri.

brummett-and-boon-1830-chariton-co-mo
William Brummett, husband of Sarah Evans and Elijah Boon, husband of Nancy Evans in Chariton County, Missouri 1830.  FamilySearch

UPDATE!

Family Tree DNA’s help desk got back to me Monday, October 24 via Facebook to confirm that this is a full mitochondrial sequence match!  Sarah Evans and Nancy Evans are sisters!  When our display glitch is fixed I will add the mtDNA match picture here.  My mother also matches an AncestryDNA kit administered by user RossEddy1, both are descendants of Elijah Gumbs Boon and Nancy Evans.

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Full mitochondrial sequence match between Nancy Boon (Nancy Evans) and Sarah Brummett (Sarah Evans) confirmed!
fms-match-and-genealogical-info-evans
Family Tree DNA fixed it quickly.  This is the genealogical information sent to me by our match, this is the image I will use in our Ancestry.com family tree.
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Genealogy, Uncategorized

Thomas Benton Brummett

Or however his last name is spelled.  I copied and pasted this paragraph from a post I made elsewhere.  Thanks to Ancestry.com users momworldorder and margos1776 for sharing their lovely family photos.

This is Beatrice Ortega. Her maternal grandmother was Mary Ann Brummett of Livingston County, Missouri. The gentleman is Thomas Benton Brummett, one of the few Brummetts I have seen a picture of so far. I’m sure I’m researching the correct family because of their similarities! Thomas Benton Brummett was Beatrice Ortega’s maternal grand-uncle. It was because Thomas named one of his daughters Sarah Evans Brummett in honor of his mother that I was able to confirm Sarah Evans as my 5th great grandmother. He’s one of those ancestors who stands out; I think he wanted us to know of him and his family and I’m very grateful for it.

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Genealogy, Uncategorized

April Sauceda AncestryDNA Family Tree

Santa My mom, April Sauceda, agreed to do yet another DNA test as a Christmas gift this year!  Here’s her family tree.  I purposefully attached National Geographic Genographic Project’s image of the cute little girl with the skis to everyone like Thomas Benton Brummit who should be our mtDNA matches so people would be like, “Whaaaat?!” and stop to look.  #trainwreckgenealogy

Genealogy

New DNA Project: Mothers of Missouri

I started a new mitochondrial DNA project at Family Tree DNA, Mothers of Missouri.  The only qualification necessary is that someone on your direct maternal line (this ancestor can only be a woman) started a family in Missouri at some point.  That’s it.  Boom.  Join me.  Open to men and women.

I submitted a new project proposal a while back.  The website said I would hear from FTDNA within 7 business days.  The self-doubter that I am, I thought maybe my project was so outlandish that they didn’t bother getting back to me.  I decided to go another route and hire a professional genealogist instead.  I was surprised to get an email on Wednesday September 30th, “My apologies for the delay in reviewing your project application, we have been a bit backlogged lately. We have approved your application for the Mothers of Missouri Project.”  !!!

This project is open to anyone (male and female) who can trace their maternal line to Missouri.

The goal of this project is to identify the maternal lineages of the people of Missouri past and present.  Participants are encouraged to share names, information, and pictures (if possible) of their Missouri maternal ancestors to aid our collaboration.  Posts to the group, photos, and comments are only available to members of this project.

Maternal line ancestry can be so difficult to research, particularly because of changing family names every generation.  Pairing knowledge of our ancestors’geographical locations along with genetic evidence gives us an edge in identifying families and clusters of related individuals.  With that in mind, I started this project to hopefully one day provide Missouri researchers a catalog of Missouri maternal lineages.

Join my project! Please share!
Join my project! Please share!
Genealogy

The Mystery of Sarah Jane Taylor: Let’s Review

The professional genealogist I am working with, Ms.Deborah, sent me a list of questions for clarification in my search for the parents of Sarah Evans (Sarah Jane Taylor’s maternal grandmother) and I thought our correspondence would make a great review of the information we have so far.  I began with an email from the top of my head to inform Ms. Deborah of what I know:

“My ancestor James Taylor was the father of my 3rd great grandmother Sarah Jane Taylor.  For years I struggled to find her father because her death certificate said he was John Taylor from Iola, Kansas [Edit: this info was wrong, her DC clearly states James was her father].  Long story short, one day I finally found a book with some information about him including the name of his first wife who was Sarah Jane’s mother, Mary Ann Brummitt.

I’ve included James and Mary Ann’s marriage record.
I searched the 1850 census and came to the conclusion that William Brummett and his wife Sarah must have been Mary Ann’s parents because the families are all living close to each other and I didn’t see another Brummett family in the area.
On the 1850 census it says William Brummet is from Virginia and Sarah is from North Carolina [Edit: see above link].
I looked in Livingston County for a record of marriage, didn’t find one, but found one in Chariton County for William Brummett and Sallie Evans in 1827 [Edit: see link above].
I haven’t found and record of Sarah Evans in Chariton County prior to 1827.  I suspect she was not William Brummett’s first wife based on their age differences.  I have seen that she died 14 March 1873 and is buried in Dockery Cemetery, Livingston County, MO. Someone on facebook said the cemetery is on a private farm but that the family allows visitors if they get advanced notice.  He did not have their contact info. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=1&GScid=1961491&GRid=7370107&
I have searched for an obituary or death notice, The Missouri State Historical Society has informed me that “Unfortunately no information was found pertaining to your research request (obituary/death announcement for Sarah/Sally Brummett). The following newspapers were searched:  Chillicothe Constitution, Trenton Republican, Gallatin North Missourian.”

Sarah Evans’ and William Brummett’s children were:

Mary Ann married Taylor born about 1831

Eliza Jane married Wilson 1833-1885

Susan Francis married Karr 1836-1912

Henry Clark Brummitt 1837-1907

James Brummitt 1840-?

William W. Brummett 1843-1903

Elijah Brumet 1845-?

John Brummett 1847-1914

Thomas Benton Brummitt (who had a daughter he named Sarah Evans Brummit, so sweet) 1849-1933

Sarah F. married Rusler 1852-1919

I ordered the Family Group Sheet from Yates publishing against my better judgement, but didn’t really learn anything new.  I didn’t write to any of the people who submitted because I figured by now they probably don’t live at those addresses anymore.

Additionally, I have my mother’s DNA with 23andMe and mine and my grandmother’s at Family Tree DNA, autosomal and mitochondrial.  I have enclosed her mitochondrial match and ancestral match list just so you can get an idea of how frustrated I am.  I think mitochondrial DNA could really help me out if I could identify who Sarah Evans’ mother may have been and worked forward to a living maternal descendant.”

Ms. Deborah then sent a list of questions.
Q: I am looking at the info. on the DNA matches correctly, that there were no matches?
A: There were no mitochondrial (maternal line) DNA matches! [Family Tree DNA]
Q: Where does the date of death for Mary Ann Taylor come from (1856-59)?  In the county history it states she died about 1864.
A: My date of death for Mary Ann comes from the estimated birth year of her daughter Sarah Jane Taylor which was about 1855 and that James Taylor was remarried by 1860 to his 2nd wife Geraldine Dennison.  Their son Samuel G. Taylor was born about 1858 as well so I assumed the book was wrong.  Also my ancestor Sarah Jane Taylor was about 5 on the 1860 census and is with her father James and stepmother Geraldine so I figured her mother Mary Ann was dead.The line of descent which I should have told you from the beginning is me-> April Sauceda-> Dolores Romero (the home person on my tree)-> Ramona Ortega-> Sarah Jane Taylor-> Mary Ann Brummett-> Sarah Evans if I am correct.
Q: Did you notice on the family group sheets you sent (there were 25 of them) had two for William Brummitt and Sarah Evans, but neither listed Mary Ann as a child?  Are you a descendant of Mary Ann Brummitt Taylor?  (Just want to make sure we have Mary Ann connected to the correct parents.)
A: I didn’t rely on anyone’s research for most of this line, Mary Ann only had 3 children, of which only one (Sarah Jane my 3rd great grandmother) survived to have children of her own so I’m not surprised no one else knew about her.  My branch of the family split quite radically and went to New Mexico.  Sarah Jane was in Colorado with her father James, met Dionicio Ortega somehow, and went to New Mexico to get married.  I connected Mary Ann to Sarah Evans and William Brummet by way of the 1850 census.  Mary Ann is living with her husband James Taylor.  Both the Taylor and Brummett families are close by.  I believe I sent you the 3 pages of the 1850 census in question.  There weren’t any other Brummets in the county and the DAR genealogist I was working with approved this connection.  I would be very interested if you came up with an alternative conclusion.
Genealogy

Genetic Genealogy: International Matches

Some of our autosomal Family Tree DNA matches on my maternal line have foreign email addresses but because I don’t know who our common ancestors could be, I don’t contact them.  Maybe I would if I had some idea of how we are connected but I don’t, so for now at least, I won’t.  Intentionally.

It was by chance that Ken’s father’s long name caught my eye as one of our new matches.  The account was registered to a gmail address so I figured it was a domestic match.  I googled the email address as I usually do and saw that Ken is a genealogist who has a Facebook page for genealogy!  So exciting!  I left a message on the page not realizing that he and his family are in and from the UK.

So that’s how I accidentally got in touch with two (bonus!  Ken also is a match for us as well as his father) of our international matches.  Ken helps people with their UK genealogy so please, if you have roots in the UK, go check out his page Genealogy by Ken!

Long story short: He wasn’t aware of anyone on his father’s side coming to the US before our matches, but that his father is mostly Scottish so our common ancestor is probably Scottish too (or maybe Irish but probably Scottish).  I would love to know more about this person!  May I join a Clan?  Can I adopt a Tartan?  Should I read “Outlander”?