Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
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Genealogy

Romero Family of Santa Fe, New Mexico

Grandma Dolores didn’t speak much of her father, she said she didn’t remember him very well.  When I was a child I didn’t think much of it.  She did always claim her middle name was Salomé though, but no one on her mother Domitila Gonzales’ side of the family had that name.

After she passed I took another look at her birth certificate and saw she didn’t have a middle name, though she did use the middle initial “S” on some of her important documents, such as on the affidavit for her marriage license.  She insisted that it stood for Salomé.

Eloy Martinez Dolores S. Romero Marriage
Marriage of Eloy Martinez and Dolores S. Romero January 1950 in Phoenix, Arizona. Eloy Martinez was grandma’s legal husband though not my grandfather.  The “S” here is exactly like the “S” for South in the street address listed above.

Her parents Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were married in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1924.  On the application for the marriage license, Manuel says his birthday is February 11, 1891.

Manuel Romero marriage part 1
The marriage of Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales June 1924 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Manuel Romero’s birthday is February 11, 1891.
Domitila divorce Manuel Romero
By April 1934 Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were separated. My grandmother Dolores would have been around 7 years old.

In the book, New Mexico Baptisms, Santa Fe, NM, January 1884-December 1899 there is a record for Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892.  The day and the year are off, but the month is the same.  His parents were Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.  I believe this Manuel is my grandmother’s father.  I had seen them on the Santa Fe census in the past and wondered if they were Manuel’s family, but I didn’t have any clue about Manuel’s birthday back then.  The scanned page of the baptism book was provided to me by Denver Public Library.

Manuel Romero baptism
Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892 to Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.

Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya were married November 27, 1886, at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe.  Their parents were Desiderio Romero and Guadalupe Lujan, and Baltazar Montoya and Eleanor Ribera.  On other documents, she is written as Leonor Ribera. From the book Santa Fe Marriages, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858-October 1889

Luciano Romero Salome Montoya marriage 1886
Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya married November 27, 1886, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

After Salomé died, Luciano married Ursula Rodriguez.

Luciano Romero Ursula Rodriguez marriage 1900
Luciano Romero, widowed of Salomé Montoya, married Ursula Rodriguez in 1900.

On some census records, Manuel’s birthday is in May, but the names all match up so I’m sure this is the correct family.

Manuel Romero 1900 census
1900 Census in Santa Fe, here Manuel Romero’s birthday is in May of 1891. This might be why he believed he was born in 1891. He is listed with his siblings, stepmother Ursula Rodriguez, father Luciano Romero and his paternal grandfather Desiderio Romero lives nearby.

Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya and Juana Gonzales. From the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Parish and Military Chapel of Our Lady of Light (La Castrense) 1728-1857

Baltazar Montoya and Maria Leonor Ribera 1850
Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and and Maria Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya & Juana Gonzales, and Francisco Ribera & Marcelina Quintana.
Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

C Romero Sauceda AncestryDNA
CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

CSDNA Ancestry Profile
CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.
Genealogy

Jose Dionicio Ortega, husband of Sarah Jane Taylor

He was born on April 6, 1852, in the Village of Rio Tesuque, New Mexico to Jose Miguel Ortega and Francisca Romero.  He was baptized in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 11, 1852.

I somehow failed to notice his death certificate partial information on FamilySearch which gave me the date of his death and the names of his parents (ok, one was wrong, it happens).dionicio-ortega-death-record-familysearch

Someone on Facebook was able to find his obituary, which read:

“Dionicio Ortega, aged 84 passed away at his home this morning after an illness of several months. He was born in Tesuque but had made his home in Santa Fe for the past 60 years where he made countless friends who will mourn his passing. He was a member of the Cathedral parish and had taken a very active part in church affairs. Surviving Mr. Ortega are four daughters, Mrs. Carolina Garcia, Mrs. Frank Narvize, Mrs. Frank Armijo, and Ms. Isabel Ortega; two sons Celestino and Manuel, all of Santa Fe, [?] grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren also survive. The body was taken to the home 323 Rosario Street this afternoon and will lie in state there [?] of funeral services, which will be announced later by the [?] Andrew funeral home.”
dionicio-oretga-obit-santa-fe-new-mexican-mon-july-6-1936-page-4
Dionicio Ortega born 1852 Tesuque, Santa Fe County, New Mexico died July 6, 1936 in Santa Fe, Santa Fe, New Mexico. This obituary appeared in The Santa Fe New Mexican
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Tue, Jul 7, 1936 – Page 2
I looked to see if he was in Rosario Cemetery, the same cemetery Sarah Jane Taylor is buried but he wasn’t listed in this index.  We visited Sarah Jane Taylor last December.
sjt-in-rosario-cem
Sarah Jane Taylor (born 1855, Livingston County, Missouri death June 20, 1927), wife of Dionicio Ortega in Rosario Cemetery, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Taken December 2016.
I asked this Facebook group where I would find a baptism record for Dionisio if he were born in Tesuque in 1852 and the esteemed Patricia Sanchez Rau told me he would have been baptized in Santa Fe, and that she already had the information on Dionisio and his family. Approximately 75% of this journey has been me asking the right people poorly worded questions.
psr-to-the-rescue
“From Santa Fe Baptisms 1851 to 1867, published by HGRC, Alb. NM p. 20 – page 74 of the church register Jose Dionisio Ortega, bap 11 Apr 1852 ae 5 da; s/ Miguel Ortega and Francisca Romero, ap/ Pablo Ortega and Tomasa Gonzales, am/ Natividad Romero and Vitalia Garcia, gp/ Rafael Sandoval and Ynes Benavides.”
For the record, Patricia sent me her tree for Dionicio Ortega’s family, but she doesn’t have Vitalia Garcia as Francisca Romero’s mother.  Since I am just starting on his family I haven’t worked it all out yet.  I’ve just looked for the 1860 Census since that would be the first Dionicio would appear. Out of curiosity, I looked up the family on the 1850 census as well.
miguel-ortega-francisca-romero-1850-santa-fe-county
1850 Census, part of Santa Fe County, New Mexico. Pre-Dionisio Jose Miguel Ortega is listed with his family Francisca Romero, Maria Andrea, and Romulo. The next family are his parents Pablo Ortega and Maria Tomasa.
pablo-ortega-tomasa-gonzales-1860-rio-tesuque
1860 Census, the Village of Rio Tesuque, Santa Fe, New Mexico. We see Dionisio Ortega written here as Leonicio Ortega, and Romulo Ortega named twice. Here the children are living with their paternal grandparents, Pablo Ortega and Tomasa Gonzales.
This is all in my mother’s tree linked to her AncestryDNA profile: Sauceda Romero Family Tree
Genealogy

Mom’s Shared Ancestor Hints and NADs

Because I should probably write something every once in a while.

She has 11 Shared Ancestor Hints:

  • Two share Candelario Garza Martinez and Felicitas Cantú
    • Candelario Garza Martinez born about 1834 in Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico to Froilan de la Garza and Rita Martinez
    • We don’t know when or where Felicitas Cantú was born, but the couple ended up in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico as seen on my ancestor Francisca Garza’s baptism record.
    • One match is a known cousin, the other through the couple’s daughter, Candelaria Garza.
  • Three share Maria Guadalupe Martín, and only Maria Guadalupe Martín because each is listed with a different husband and children.
Manuel Urioste.jpg
In our tree: This is from the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 published by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.  It shows Manuel Urioste’s wife Maria Guadalupe Martín has died so he goes on to marry Maria Felipe Montoya.  Manuel Urioste and Maria Guadalupe Martín’s sons Feliz Urioste and Aniceto Urioste were the witnesses.

New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 a publication by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.

st-francis-cathedral-santa-fe
My son and I in front of St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2016
  • FINALLY one descendant of William Brummet and Sarah Evans through their daughter Susan Frances Brummitt.
    • Susan Frances Brummitt was born 1836 in Grundy County, Missouri and married John William Karr in 1857.
  • Two share Juan Ygnacio Armijo and Maria Eulalia Sandoval
    • We don’t know where Juan Ygnacio Armijo or Maria Eulalia Sandoval were born, but their son (our ancestor) Ruperto Armijo was born in 1826 in Pena Blanca, Sandoval County, New Mexico.
    • One match is through their son Antonio Armijo born about 1834, the other is through their daughter Maria Estefanita Armijo born about 1822.
  • The last three have private trees so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mom is up to three New Ancestor Discoveries who I thought maybe could bee in-laws but so far I haven’t been able to place them.

  • Richard Scott and Rebecca Ann Cooper
    • Richard Scott was born in 1807 in Virginia.
    • He married Rebecca Ann Cooper in Virginia 1838.
  • James Harris born about 1811 in Bedford County, Virginia [ Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 on Ancestry]

mom-nads

Genealogy

Thomas Benton Brummett

Or however his last name is spelled.  I copied and pasted this paragraph from a post I made elsewhere.  Thanks to Ancestry.com users momworldorder and margos1776 for sharing their lovely family photos.

This is Beatrice Ortega. Her maternal grandmother was Mary Ann Brummett of Livingston County, Missouri. The gentleman is Thomas Benton Brummett, one of the few Brummetts I have seen a picture of so far. I’m sure I’m researching the correct family because of their similarities! Thomas Benton Brummett was Beatrice Ortega’s maternal grand-uncle. It was because Thomas named one of his daughters Sarah Evans Brummett in honor of his mother that I was able to confirm Sarah Evans as my 5th great grandmother. He’s one of those ancestors who stands out; I think he wanted us to know of him and his family and I’m very grateful for it.

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