Genealogy, History

Daughters of the American Revolution Patriot Jose Viterbo de Ribera

I originally planned on applying for the Daughters of the American Revolution through my ancestor Baltasar Gonzales, but as I explained in the last post, he was not present at the presidio at the time that would have made him eligible as a patriot.

It turns out another of my ancestors, Jose Viterbo de Ribera was present at the time and is eligible as a DAR patriot so I applied through him.

He was baptized Joseph Viterbo de Ribera at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico March 11, 1754, son of Antonio de Rivera (Rivera/Ribera alternates) and Maria Graciana Prudencia de Sena.

Jose Viterbo married Maria de la Luz Pacheco March 14, 1778 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They had at least three children: Juan Estevan de Ribera, Juan Manuel de Ribera, and my direct ancestor Jose Francisco Ribera who was baptized March 15, 1802 in Santa Fe. Jose Viterbo was about 48, his wife Maria de la Luz was around 40 years old.

Jose Francisco Ribera married Maria Marcelina de los Dolores Quintana (widowed of Antonio Jose Alarid) of Nambe (listed from Pojoaque at her first marriage) in Santa Fe on June 1, 1831. My ancestor Maria Leonor Ribera was baptized May 20, 1838.

Maria Leonor Ribera married Baltasar Albino Montoya in Santa Fe on December 11, 1850.  They had many children; my ancestor Salome Montoya was born around 1864. She can be seen on the 1870 census as a six year old with her parents and siblings.

Salome Montoya married Luciano Romero November 27, 1886. My great grandfather Manuel Romero was baptized February 28, 1892. He married my great grandmother Domitilia Gonzales in Santa Fe on June 9, 1924.

Domitilia Gonzales Manuel Romero Marriage 1924
Manuel Romero and Domitilia Gonzales marriage, Santa Fe, New Mexico June 9, 1924. Notice his parents are listed Luciano Romero and Salome Montoya.

My grandmother Dolores Romero was born in Santa Fe, New Mexico a few years after their marriage.

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My certificate from Daughters of the American Revolution recognizing my patriot ancestor Jose Viterbo de Ribera. His state is listed as Spanish America, which I love. I can’t wait until my son is of the age to appreciate how our Mexican-American ancestors contributed to history.

 

Here are some links about the Hispanic/Latino contribution to the American Revolution:

Somos Primos: Spanish Patriots in the American Revolution

Presidial Soldiers Donation to the American Colonies

Spain in the American Revolution

Bernardo de Galvez (not New Mexico, but very important)

VIDEO: Spanish Participation in the American Revolution

BOOK: The Santa Fe Presidio Soldiers: Their Donation to the American Revolution

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Genealogy, History

Baltasar Gonzales and the King’s Deer

My ancestor Baltasar Gonzales, who was married to Maria de la Cruz Lopez (sometimes she appears as Ana Maria Lopez), was mentioned in the book The Santa Fe Presidio Soldiers: Their Donation to the American Revolution by Henrietta Martinez Christmas (HMS for short).  The soldiers in the book are recognized by Sons of the American Revolution or Daughters of the American Revolution, so naturally, my curiosity was piqued.

As it turns out, King Charles III of Spain asked his colonists to donate money to the American cause; the “donativo” qualifies some soldiers for DAR.  That’s the short version of it, there’s also the huge assist by Bernardo de Galvez of Spain.  I think I didn’t learn about this in school, did you?

HMS on Youtube!

Anyway, I was set to apply to DAR as a descendent of Baltasar Gonzales but he is one of the few soldiers of the Presidio who are not considered patriots because they were elsewhere during the donation collection.

So where was he?  Long story short again, he was selected to take five fancy New Mexico mule deer back to King Charles III of Spain as a gift.  Captain don Francisco Trebol Navarro selected Manuel Saenz Garvisu, Bartolome Gonzales, Joaquin Trujillo, Julian Ortiz, and Rafael Baca for the long journey, expected to be about three years time.

muledeerOutdoorLifemag
New Mexico mule deer. Outdoor Life Magazine.

They arrived in Mexico City from Santa Fe, when Rafael Baca went back home.  The others arrived at the Port of Veracruz by May 1781.  They set sail on the battleship Arrogante and arrived at the Port of Cadiz October 1781.  Author Jose Antonio Esquibel wrote an article about this event for the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico’s journal Herencia entitled “Deer for the King and a Journey to Spain: The Commission of don Francisco Trebol Navarro, 1779-1785” that appeared in one of the 1993 issues.

Deer for the King Esquibel Herencia 1993
Jose Antonio Esquibel’s article “Deer for the King” Herencia Journal 1993

What a surprising and interesting turn of events that allowed my ancestor to travel on a battleship to Spain.

Genealogy, Uncategorized

Ortega House Santa Fe NM Trip 2018

A while back I was contacted by the current owners of Dionicio Ortega and Sarah Jane Taylor’s adobe Pueblo house.  We had a Santa Fe trip planned months ago, so I asked them if we could stop by while we where visiting the city and they accepted.

The current owners have done extensive research on their property which revealed that the Ortegas owned much of the surrounding property and that it was later divided among Dionicio and Sarah Jane’s children.

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Dionicio Ortega and Sarah Jane Taylor House, original (or near-original) floors and ceilings. Mr. Current Owner told me he did a little digging when they were fixing the place up and found “a lime-coated floor, and that was probably what was there when Sarah Jane and Dionicio moved in. They may have later put in the wood planks that are still there because they are very old. Two inches beneath the lime floor was another floor made of animal blood mixed with dirt, which makes for a linoleum-like surface.” (see linked post, “The House They Lived In”) Little Guy is clearly jazzed to stand on the floors where his ancestors once stood.
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Mr. C.O. described how this, the original house consisting of a small living/dining area, had only one window. They hired people familiar with the old Pueblo homes to cut (saw, that’s the motion he’s making) new windows out of the thick adobe walls.
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This room with the tiny door (they were all tiny doors!) was originally the stable. As we know, Dionicio was a muleteer and kept a few mules here. When the owners were doing renovations, they discovered a donkey jaw bone and various other small bones in the walls. The stepping stone outside the door (which was then an exterior door) was actually the overturned headstone of New Mexico’s first attorney general, Hugh N. Smith. Apparently when the old cemetery was demolished people salvaged the stones for use in their homes.  My husband and Mr. C.O. pictured here.
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Said headstone of New Mexico’s first attorney general Hugh N. Smith. At first I was embarrassed, but then again, the Ortegas wasted nothing. The C.O.s decided to keep it and turn it the correct side up. This wing of the house is a new addition by the C.O.s It is lovely.
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My family and I in front of the original house. Dionicio and Sarah Jane’s children added on later, as did the current owners. The surrounding properties once belonged to this Ortega family but are now owned by other people. It was a large tract of land!
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The current owners. They are very nice and have taken wonderful care of the house. I am so grateful they gave me the opportunity to show the house to my Little Guy!  Thank you so much C.O.s!

We like to visit Rosario Cemetery when we go.

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Visiting Sarah Jane Taylor, my 3rd great grandmother, Little Guy’s 4th great grandmother. We confirmed with the office staff that Dionicio is buried in the same cemetery but even they don’t know where he is buried further than the “old cemetery”.
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Little Guy found Beatrice Ortega Taylor’s grave 1896-1922. She married Alejandro Shoemaker, son of Sheriff Shoemaker, who was excited about a new gun he’d received and went home to show his young wife. According to the article in the local paper, the gun went off and hit her; she died a couple of days later. She was 26 years old.

We again didn’t make it to Santa Fe’s National Cemetery adjacent to Rosario Cemetery which is a shame, especially considering today is Memorial Day.

Next time we will visit my 4th great grandfather there, Ruperto Armijo, who was part of the 2nd New Mexico Regiment Infantry during the Civil War.

We also visited St. Francis of Assisi, Cross of the Martyrs, Fort Marcy Park, the public library, the Palace of the Governors Museum Shop to buy books, and Meow Wolf while we were there this time. I highly recommend Meow Wolf.

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Musical Mammoth at Meow Wolf
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Little Guy and I at St. Francis Cathedral. Off the top of my head my second great grandparents Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya were married there 27 Nov 1886, and the ill-fated Beatrice Ortega Taylor de Shoemaker on April 28, 1916.
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Reading Room at the Santa Fe Public Library near Governors’ Plaza.

Looking forward to our next visit!

Genealogy

My Son’s Autosomal DNA

By Family Tree DNA

BLOG LG DNA matches

Admixture calculations provided by Eurogenes K13 on Gedmatch

LGGedmatch

Genealogy

The House They Lived In

The person who currently owns the house that Dionicio Ortega and his wife Sarah Jane Taylor lived in recently contacted me in hopes of learning new things about the house.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have any cool stories for them but was very happy they contacted me with new information.  They provided me with some of the paperwork that listed Sarah Jane Taylor and Dionicio Ortega as the deed owners of the house which I took as evidence their story was true.

They asked me not to share any of their identifying information which I agreed to withhold for their privacy (I am using the singular pronoun they/their to speak of this person).  This person was such a great storyteller that I’m going to share their words with you verbatim.

They started out with some interesting questions such as, “When I first moved here, an elderly man said that an Irish woman married a man from Tesuque Pueblo and moved into our house long ago. That sounds like it could have been Dionicio, and if so, he would have been Native American. Does any of that ring true? Do you have any idea what brought Sarah to the rough ’n tough New Mexico of the 19th century?”

I told them I didn’t know for sure, but on the 1860 census, she was five years old living with her father, her older full brother Isaiah, and her father’s second wife Geraldine Dennison in Missouri.  We know that Isaiah died in his childhood, up to that point they were the only living children from her father’s first marriage to Mary Ann Brummett, daughter of William Brummit and Sarah Evans.  On the 1870 census, she was about 15 years old living with her father and stepfamily in Cañon City, Colorado (as mentioned in the book History of Howard and Chariton Counties, Missouri).  Her stepmother Geraldine Denison died there in 1875.  My guess is she was coming of age in this radically different place and met Dionicio at some point as he was traveling.  Another cousin who rescues horses and mules has told me Dionicio was a muleteer on the Santa Fe Trail, but I haven’t verified it.  I do think they met in Colorado though.  On the 1880 census, she was living as Juana Ortega with Dionicio and their child Crisostimo in Cordoras, Taos, NM.  Almost all of the 1890 census was destroyed in a fire.  Sarah and Dionicio are in Santa Fe on the 1900 census.  Sarah Jane died in 1927, Dionicio died in 1936.  I think Sarah Jane Taylor learned early to roll with the punches and was rather adventurous.  It seemed she was a curious person and was eager to embrace new places and cultures; I like to think I inherited that from her.

The person who contacted me about the house was an out-of-towner who immediately liked it and was lucky to have noticed it during a price-drop.

“A little investigation and it turned out it was because this was a “haunted house”. Neighborhood children wouldn’t go near it, and throughout the 70’s and 80’s no one owned it for more than a year or two before selling, due to all the bizarre things happening there. It was common knowledge that these ghosts were mischievous and frisky.

That was a great stroke of luck for us because we didn’t believe in ghosts. We bought it and the neighbors would shake their heads and say “You won’t stay long – nobody does”.

So that was [many] years ago, and we never experienced anything the least bit unusual, nor have any of the many guests who have stayed here.

What is now the main living room area was the original one-room adobe house. We did an extensive renovation, and when the floorboards were pulled up temporarily to put a heating system under there, I did some digging. A couple of inches down I found a lime-coated floor, and that was probably what was there when Sarah Jane and Dionicio moved in. They may have later put in the wood planks that are still there because they are very old. Two inches beneath the lime floor was another floor made of animal blood mixed with dirt, which makes for a linoleum-like surface. Nobody knows how old this place really is.

Our guest room used to be a detached stable, and when it rained we could still smell the animals that your ancestors kept there. I carved a niche into one of the adobe walls and found a donkey’s jawbone embedded in it.

Although plumbing had been installed by the 1950’s, the original outhouse for the house was still standing in one corner of the property when we moved in. We had to remove it to build [further]. You can still see the remains of a well that was the main water source for the house all those years ago. But you would have to lift the brick pavers in our courtyard and dig down about a foot to find it.
I also found a horseshoe and some smaller animal bones in that wall. All of the old adobe walls are 2 feet thick, so who knows what else is in there?”

I forgot to mention that when I dug down and found those 2 layers of flooring, I kept digging. About 2 feet down I found pottery shards in typical black and white patterns for Native Americans in this area. So people have been living on this spot for a VERY long time.”

I asked about using their stories on this blog:

“Using this info on your blog is okay if there is some way to discourage people from googling around to find me and then show up at my door.” So I am not giving out the address or the name of the person who contacted me, just passing along the story.

I can’t express how grateful I am to have been able to receive these stories as it’s put a little more flesh on my ancestors’ bones.  I feel a little closer to knowing them and their personalities now.

Ortega House email

Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
Genealogy

Romero Family of Santa Fe, New Mexico

Grandma Dolores didn’t speak much of her father, she said she didn’t remember him very well.  When I was a child I didn’t think much of it.  She did always claim her middle name was Salomé though, but no one on her mother Domitila Gonzales’ side of the family had that name.

After she passed I took another look at her birth certificate and saw she didn’t have a middle name, though she did use the middle initial “S” on some of her important documents, such as on the affidavit for her marriage license.  She insisted that it stood for Salomé.

Eloy Martinez Dolores S. Romero Marriage
Marriage of Eloy Martinez and Dolores S. Romero January 1950 in Phoenix, Arizona. Eloy Martinez was grandma’s legal husband though not my grandfather.  The “S” here is exactly like the “S” for South in the street address listed above.

Her parents Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were married in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1924.  On the application for the marriage license, Manuel says his birthday is February 11, 1891.

Manuel Romero marriage part 1
The marriage of Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales June 1924 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Manuel Romero’s birthday is February 11, 1891.
Domitila divorce Manuel Romero
By April 1934 Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were separated. My grandmother Dolores would have been around 7 years old.

In the book, New Mexico Baptisms, Santa Fe, NM, January 1884-December 1899 there is a record for Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892.  The day and the year are off, but the month is the same.  His parents were Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.  I believe this Manuel is my grandmother’s father.  I had seen them on the Santa Fe census in the past and wondered if they were Manuel’s family, but I didn’t have any clue about Manuel’s birthday back then.  The scanned page of the baptism book was provided to me by Denver Public Library.

Manuel Romero baptism
Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892 to Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.

Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya were married November 27, 1886, at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe.  Their parents were Desiderio Romero and Guadalupe Lujan, and Baltazar Montoya and Eleanor Ribera.  On other documents, she is written as Leonor Ribera. From the book Santa Fe Marriages, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858-October 1889

Luciano Romero Salome Montoya marriage 1886
Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya married November 27, 1886, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

After Salomé died, Luciano married Ursula Rodriguez.

Luciano Romero Ursula Rodriguez marriage 1900
Luciano Romero, widowed of Salomé Montoya, married Ursula Rodriguez in 1900.

On some census records, Manuel’s birthday is in May, but the names all match up so I’m sure this is the correct family.

Manuel Romero 1900 census
1900 Census in Santa Fe, here Manuel Romero’s birthday is in May of 1891. This might be why he believed he was born in 1891. He is listed with his siblings, stepmother Ursula Rodriguez, father Luciano Romero and his paternal grandfather Desiderio Romero lives nearby.

Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya and Juana Gonzales. From the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Parish and Military Chapel of Our Lady of Light (La Castrense) 1728-1857

Baltazar Montoya and Maria Leonor Ribera 1850
Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and and Maria Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya & Juana Gonzales, and Francisco Ribera & Marcelina Quintana.