Genealogy

Evans 1789 Personal Tax List Greensville County Virginia

Tax list from Binns Genealogy (“1790” Census, reconstructed.  Index)

People listed on the 1790 marriage record:

Henry Evans

Evans 1789 Personal A Tax List
Henry Evans on the 1789 tax list in Greensville County, Virginia. I don’t know who either William Evans are just yet. Could be of interest.

 

John Goodwyn

John Goodwyn 1789 Personal Tax List A
John Goodwyn, the bondsman, on the 1789 tax list in Greensville County, Virginia.
Esau and Armistead Goodwyn 1789 Tax List B
Esau Goodwyn and Armistead Goodwyn, possibly related to the bondsman John Goodwyn. Tax List 1789 Greensville County, Virginia.

 

J. Parks

J Parks 1789 Personal Tax list A
Could be one of these J Parks that was the witness.

 

William Andrews

William Andrews 1789 Tax List A
Possibly William Andrews, the Methodist minister in Greensville County, Virginia.
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Genealogy

Evans Family of Northampton County New Lead

About a year ago we received our first mtDNA match, a descendant of Nancy Evans of Northampton County, North Carolina who married Elijah Gums Boon and moved to Missouri.  Since then we’ve also received a match who is a descendant of Martha Marston through her daughter Mildred “Millie” Lewis.

I’ve been looking for a way the families paths could have crossed and think it may have been in Virginia.  I’ll get back to this point later.

The first match, Nancy’s descendant, mentioned a letter from her maternal line ancestor, Nancy Morrison (married Samuel Mize) from 1910.  The letter states, “you want to know about Grand Mother [sic], her maiden name was Evans, her mother’s name was Sarah Hayes.  Grand Mother was born in 1795, her father was a soldier in the Revolutionary war…”

Nancy Morrison Mize letter 1910
Excerpt from Nancy (Morrison) Mize’s letter about her grandmother Nancy Evans. She states Nancy was born in 1795, and that her mother was a woman named Sarah Hayes. The identity of Sarah Hayes’ husband is not revealed, although we know he is an Evans. This letter was found at Ancestry.com, on cousin match (moderate) and user RossEddy1’s family tree. I am not the owner of this letter.

Credit to RossEddy1 for the family letter on Ancestry.

Since I didn’t find mention of Henry Evans prior to 1810 in Northampton County, North Carolina so I spoke with a local professional genealogist at the McClelland Irish Library.  She told me to keep an open mind and also search Virginia records since Northampton was on the highly porous border.  She also told me to search for marriage records for Sarah Hayes, which I finally did today.

Greensville County Marriages page 25
From microfilm of the book “Register of Marriages, Greensville County, Virginia1781-1853” page 25 near the bottom, “Evans Henry and Salley Hayes 21 Sep 1790”

From microfilm of the book “Register of Marriages, Greensville County, Virginia1781-1853” page 25 near the bottom, “Evans Henry and Salley Hayes 21 Sep 1790; b- John Goodwyn wit- J Parks min-William Andrews (Methodist) 30Sep1790

Page 25 also mentions a couple from Northampton County getting married in Greensville County, so there’s that.

Now, this part is just speculation, but I couldn’t help notice Greensville County isn’t terribly far from Isle of Wight County.  According to online trees (I know, I know), Darling Drewry/Drury’s mother Mildred Lewis was born in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

Virginia Counties
Greensville County (top) Isle of Wight County
Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
Genealogy

Romero Family of Santa Fe, New Mexico

Grandma Dolores didn’t speak much of her father, she said she didn’t remember him very well.  When I was a child I didn’t think much of it.  She did always claim her middle name was Salomé though, but no one on her mother Domitila Gonzales’ side of the family had that name.

After she passed I took another look at her birth certificate and saw she didn’t have a middle name, though she did use the middle initial “S” on some of her important documents, such as on the affidavit for her marriage license.  She insisted that it stood for Salomé.

Eloy Martinez Dolores S. Romero Marriage
Marriage of Eloy Martinez and Dolores S. Romero January 1950 in Phoenix, Arizona. Eloy Martinez was grandma’s legal husband though not my grandfather.  The “S” here is exactly like the “S” for South in the street address listed above.

Her parents Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were married in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1924.  On the application for the marriage license, Manuel says his birthday is February 11, 1891.

Manuel Romero marriage part 1
The marriage of Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales June 1924 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Manuel Romero’s birthday is February 11, 1891.
Domitila divorce Manuel Romero
By April 1934 Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were separated. My grandmother Dolores would have been around 7 years old.

In the book, New Mexico Baptisms, Santa Fe, NM, January 1884-December 1899 there is a record for Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892.  The day and the year are off, but the month is the same.  His parents were Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.  I believe this Manuel is my grandmother’s father.  I had seen them on the Santa Fe census in the past and wondered if they were Manuel’s family, but I didn’t have any clue about Manuel’s birthday back then.  The scanned page of the baptism book was provided to me by Denver Public Library.

Manuel Romero baptism
Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892 to Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.

Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya were married November 27, 1886, at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe.  Their parents were Desiderio Romero and Guadalupe Lujan, and Baltazar Montoya and Eleanor Ribera.  On other documents, she is written as Leonor Ribera. From the book Santa Fe Marriages, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858-October 1889

Luciano Romero Salome Montoya marriage 1886
Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya married November 27, 1886, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

After Salomé died, Luciano married Ursula Rodriguez.

Luciano Romero Ursula Rodriguez marriage 1900
Luciano Romero, widowed of Salomé Montoya, married Ursula Rodriguez in 1900.

On some census records, Manuel’s birthday is in May, but the names all match up so I’m sure this is the correct family.

Manuel Romero 1900 census
1900 Census in Santa Fe, here Manuel Romero’s birthday is in May of 1891. This might be why he believed he was born in 1891. He is listed with his siblings, stepmother Ursula Rodriguez, father Luciano Romero and his paternal grandfather Desiderio Romero lives nearby.

Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya and Juana Gonzales. From the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Parish and Military Chapel of Our Lady of Light (La Castrense) 1728-1857

Baltazar Montoya and Maria Leonor Ribera 1850
Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and and Maria Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya & Juana Gonzales, and Francisco Ribera & Marcelina Quintana.
Genealogy, Movies, Music

Finally Processing

My maternal uncle’s DNA kit is being processed after a six-week wait.CS_DNA

This small update is a great excuse to share this song from Moana, which I have recently seen for the first time this past weekend.  It was so good!  Definitely one of my favorite ancestor movies right along with The Book of Life and Kubo and the Two Strings.  Disney and Pixar have another Dia de los Muertos movie, Coco, that is scheduled for release November 2017.

I loved this song, “I am Moana (Song of the Ancestors)”.

Genealogy

New mtDNA match from Northampton County NC

I knew my Sarah Evans, who married William Brummet in Chariton County, Missouri 1827, was originally from North Carolina because of the 1850 Census (Livingston County, MO).  Thanks to our first mtDNA match we learned Sarah Evans went to Missouri from Northampton County, North Carolina with her (very likely) elder sister Nancy Evans.

Nancy Evans married Elijah Gumbs Boon in 1814 before leaving Northampton County, NC.  Their children were Mary Magdalene, Henry, Presley, Nicholas, Harriet, Mildred, Clifton, Nancy, Sarah, James, and Elizabeth Boon.  Henry Evans was the bondsman.

The new mtDNA match descended from Polly Drury, mother of Martha, Drewry, Newitt, and Mildred Harris of Northampton County, North Carolina.  John Harris is the father of the children, he names them in his will. Additionally, John Harris (son-in-law) and Darling Drury (son) are named executors of Milly Warr’s will in 1801 (Mildred Lewis of Isle of Wight County, Virgina, wife of Daniel Drury then wife of James Warr).

Milly Drury Warr Will.jpg

North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 from Ancestry: Wills; Author: North Carolina. County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (Northampton County); Probate Place: Northampton, North Carolina

So now we know Polly Drury had a brother named Darling Drury, their mother was Mildred Lewis of Isle of Wight County, Virginia (this supports my Sarah “Sally” Hayes Virginia origin theory).

I saw that Henry Evans purchased one sow and six “piggs” from Darling Drury’s estate upon his death and wondered if that had any significance.  According to the FamilySearch Wiki U.S. Probate Records Class Handout:

  • Bills of Sale: During probate, it may have been necessary to sell parts of the estate in order to pay creditors, to provide support for the widow and minor children, or to distribute the property of an estate. This was done by public auction. The final bills of sale from these auctions were filed with the court. Bills of sale listed the names of individuals who purchased items at the auction. These individuals are often relatives, friends, and neighbors of the deceased person.
Darling Drewry estate sale Henry Evens
Sale of the Estate of Darling Drury (Darling Drewry) 1810 Northampton County, North Carolina. Henry Evans purchased one sow and six pigs.
Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

C Romero Sauceda AncestryDNA
CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

CSDNA Ancestry Profile
CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.