Genealogy

Missouri First Families

My Missouri First Families certificate for Sarah Evans and William Brummet from the Missouri State Genealogical Association came in today!  As I’ve mentioned before, Sarah Evans had a sister, Nancy Evans, who married Elijah Gumbs Boon.  Their descendants would be eligible for the same certificate if any cousins are interested in pursuing it.  Also, obligatory link to the Mothers of Missouri DNA Project (MoM).

Genealogy

Mom’s Shared Ancestor Hints and NADs

Because I should probably write something every once in a while.

She has 11 Shared Ancestor Hints:

  • Two share Candelario Garza Martinez and Felicitas Cantú
    • Candelario Garza Martinez born about 1834 in Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico to Froilan de la Garza and Rita Martinez
    • We don’t know when or where Felicitas Cantú was born, but the couple ended up in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico as seen on my ancestor Francisca Garza’s baptism record.
    • One match is a known cousin, the other through the couple’s daughter, Candelaria Garza.
  • Three share Maria Guadalupe Martín, and only Maria Guadalupe Martín because each is listed with a different husband and children.
Manuel Urioste.jpg
In our tree: This is from the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 published by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.  It shows Manuel Urioste’s wife Maria Guadalupe Martín has died so he goes on to marry Maria Felipe Montoya.  Manuel Urioste and Maria Guadalupe Martín’s sons Feliz Urioste and Aniceto Urioste were the witnesses.

New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 a publication by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.

st-francis-cathedral-santa-fe
My son and I in front of St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2016
  • FINALLY one descendant of William Brummet and Sarah Evans through their daughter Susan Frances Brummitt.
    • Susan Frances Brummitt was born 1836 in Grundy County, Missouri and married John William Karr in 1857.
  • Two share Juan Ygnacio Armijo and Maria Eulalia Sandoval
    • We don’t know where Juan Ygnacio Armijo or Maria Eulalia Sandoval were born, but their son (our ancestor) Ruperto Armijo was born in 1826 in Pena Blanca, Sandoval County, New Mexico.
    • One match is through their son Antonio Armijo born about 1834, the other is through their daughter Maria Estefanita Armijo born about 1822.
  • The last three have private trees so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mom is up to three New Ancestor Discoveries who I thought maybe could bee in-laws but so far I haven’t been able to place them.

  • Richard Scott and Rebecca Ann Cooper
    • Richard Scott was born in 1807 in Virginia.
    • He married Rebecca Ann Cooper in Virginia 1838.
  • James Harris born about 1811 in Bedford County, Virginia [ Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 on Ancestry]

mom-nads

Henry Evans pay voucher for service in the War of 1812.  NC ECHO.
Genealogy

A Quaker in the War of 1812?

I’m writing this mostly to make sense of it, sorry if it jumps around a lot.  I met with a genealogist recently at my local Family History Library and she gave me some really good suggestions about researching Henry Evans.

As you already know, I found him on the 1810 census in Northampton County, NC.

On this record, he was between the ages of 26 and 44, which would mean he was probably born between the years 1766 and 1784.  He had a wife, 2 boys, and 3 girls at the time.  If this is the right Henry, Nancy was probably the girl between 10-15 years old which would make sense if she married Elijah Gumbs Boon in 1815.  My Sarah may have been one of the girls under 10 as we think she was born around 1809.

henry-evans-1810-census
Henry Evans on the 1810 Census, 7 people in the household, total: Henry Evans, his wife, 2 boys, and 3 girls.

Anyway, based on the timeframe, the genealogist mentioned I should check the records for the War of 1812.  I found a pay voucher for Henry Evans of the Northampton Militia at digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll7/id/3863 and also mention of him in the muster rolls from the book Muster Rolls of the Soldiers of the War of 1812: detached from the militia of North Carolina, in 1812 and 1814 Henry Evans page 20 #79 https://archive.org/details/musterrollsofsol00nort .  I did not find a pension record for him.

henry-evans-war-of-1812-pay-voucher
Henry Evans pay voucher for service in the War of 1812. NC ECHO.

I searched Ancestry with this new information and saw a Henry Evans in the Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935.  Of course, I got way too excited for someone who knows better.  Would a Quaker have participated in the War of 1812?  I didn’t think so. So I was surprised when I Googled “Henry Evans Northampton County NC Quakers” and the first document to come up included the line,

“In First Month, 1886, there is a recorded minute to the effect that William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliott, and Henry Evans were not disowned for volunteering their services in the army.”

Wow!  A couple of prior paragraphs talk about the War of 1812 so I felt like the genealogy angels were my tech support at the moment.  Though, when I read the year 1886 I was a little bummed because if he was born even at the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he would have been 102 years old, and therefore, probably not the guy I was looking for.  I checked the Ancestry records and found the record mentioned in the pdf for the year 1866, not 1886.  If he were born at the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he’d be about 82 which is more probable than 102.

henry-evans-1866-quaker-meeting-notes
Quaker Meeting Records 1866, Rich Square Meeting in which William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliot, and Henry Evans get to retain their membership.

One of the Quaker Meeting Notes from 1843 lists his wife as Mary, and “six of their children, namely James, Sarah J[?], Martha A, Celia E, Christian, and Henry”.  I might be reading too much into “six of their children” but at this time Sarah and Nancy would have been in Missouri.  If he were born in the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he’d have been about 59 years old.  He can be 59 and still have 6 kids, right?  Especially if he remarried?

henry-evans-family-1843-meeting
Quaker Meeting Notes from 1843, Northampton County, lists Henry Evans’ wife as Mary, and “six of their children, namely James, Sarah J[?], Martha A, Celia E, Christian, and Henry”.
Henry Evans with his wife Mary and 3 of his children: James, 21 (born about 1829), Martha, 16 (born about 1834), and Celia, 14 (born about 1836) are on the 1850 census in Northampton County, NC.  These children were born well after the Henry Evans family on the 1810 census.  Still, it is possible that this could be the same Henry but with a different wife.  I assume a different wife because she was between ages 26-44 years old on the 1810 census, so if she was the youngest possible, 26, she would have been born around 1784 making her about 52 when the youngest child, Celia, was born in 1836.  Celia would have been born about 9 years after my Sarah Evans married William Brummet.

According to the 1850 census, he was about 62 years old, born in 1788.  That would have made him 22 on the 1810 census, where he is clearly marked as being between the ages of 26-44 years old.  The general rule is to stick with the information from the earliest census, so it is possible he was the youngest age available, 26, at the time making the age given in the 1850 census younger by 4 years.  Not impossible.  Also, we have Nancy Evans born around 1796.  If we add back the 4 years taken from the 1850 census, Henry Evans would have been born around 1784, making him 29 during his service in the War of 1812, 12 years old when Nancy was born (Although I find this date suspicious because her husband Elijah was born 12 Dec 1796 and Nancy is said to have been born 12 Oct 1796, what are the chances they were both born on the 12th day of the month, same year?), and 26 on the 1810 census.  There was a female 10-15 years of age on the 1810 census, if it were Nancy she would have been born 1795-1800, so I guess year-wise that is close to what we know about her.  The 1810 census pretty much says if Henry Evans had a child born around 1800, he could have been anywhere between 16 to 34 years of age (He could have been born 1766-1784 according to his age bracket).

henry-evans-1850-census
Henry Evans 1850 census Northampton County with wife Mary, and three of their children: James, Martha, and Celia.

So how can I tell if the 1810 Census Henry Evans is also the 1850 census Henry Evans?  I went back to the 1866 record of the three men who were allowed to retain their Friends (Quaker) membership despite their participation in the War of 1812.  The three men named were William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliot, and Henry Evans.  Were they in the census for Northampton County back in 1810?  That would make it more likely that they were friends in addition to being Friends (punny!).  I found William Copeland on page 7 of 44, but no Thomas.  There was an Elliot household, though, run by Sarah Elliot.

william-copeland-1810-census
William Copeland on the 1810 census of Northampton County, NC. William Copeland was one of the three men, along with Henry Evans, mentioned in the 1866 Quaker Meeting Records for being allowed to retain their membership despite their participation in the War of 1812.

Another name from the first Quaker record in which I found Henry Evans, in 1843, mentions a Josiah Outland.  Truthfully, the name Outland stood out to me because of the Outlander book series.  And Josiah isn’t a common name anymore so I went to see if I could find him on the 1810 census, he was there he is on page 29 of the Northampton census.

josiah-outland-1810-census
Josiah Outland on the 1810 census of Northampton County, NC. He was mentioned in the 1843 Quaker Meeting Records I found pertaining to Henry Evans. Josiah just sounds like a Quaker.

So, what do you think?  Is this the same Henry Evans?

Genealogy

Marriage of Elijah Gumbs Boon and Nancy Evans Northampton Co NC 1814

gumbs-evans-marriage-1814
FamilySearch microfiche containing some information about the marriage of Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans 17 February 1814

It lists Henry Evans as the bondsman and Tom Hughes as the witness.  This is what The Legal Genealogist had to say about marriage bonds and bondsmen:

“When folks married without banns, however, particularly when they married some distance away from where they were known, there wasn’t the same opportunity in advance to have folks “speak up or forever hold their peace.” The bond then stepped into the breach.

What that bond actually was, then, was a form of guarantee that there wasn’t any legal bar to the marriage. Enforcing the guarantee was a pledge by the groom and a bondsman — usually a relative — to pay a sum of money, usually to the Governor of the State (or colony if earlier, or to the Crown if in Canada6), if and only if it actually turned out that there was some reason the marriage wasn’t legal.”

Genealogy

Stalking Elijah Gumbs/Elijah Boon of Northampton County NC

He’s not even my direct ancestor, poor guy.  The microfilm that contains the record of his marriage to Nancy Evans is at my local Family History Library, but I have a weird schedule, and they have a weird schedule so maybe I’ll see it this weekend.

Online researchers say Elijah Gumbs Boon was the son of Nicholas Boon citing Nicholas Boon’s will made “on account of Elijah Gumbs [alias?] Boon” by Joyner Boon and Thomas Boon in 1807, Northampton County, North Carolina.

will-of-nicholas-boon-1807-northampton-nc
Will of Nicholas Boon made by Joyner Boon and Thomas Boon “on account of Elijah Gumbs alias Boon” at FamilySearch

Citation

“North Carolina Probate Records, 1735-1970,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1940-1023338-1-0?cc=1867501 : 21 May 2014), Northampton > Wills, 1792-1808, Vol. 02 > image 202 of 212; county courthouses, North Carolina.
There seems to be some inconsistency as he is said to have been  married to Jane Waggoner in Kentucky in 1809 and Nancy Evans in 1814, Northampton County NC.  In my previous post I found a book mentioning Elijah Boon’s daughter Mary Magdalene (b. November 13, 1814 here in the book and here on Find A Grave) with conflicting information.  Both variations are reflected in numerous genealogies online.  There seems to be two Elijah Boons, one born in Lincoln County, Kentucky and one born in Northampton County, North Carolina.  This is going to be a fun weekend.
Genealogy

Nancy Evans and Elijah Gumbs Boon of What County, North Carolina?

In my last post, I described our recent mitochondrial DNA breakthrough and described some of the information I’ve found online, including the book History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri 1886 in which Harriet (Boon) Bills speaks of her parents, Nancy Evans and Elijah Gumbs Boon of Northampton County, NC.  There is no mention of Nancy’s or Elijah’s parents.

I ordered Nancy and Elijah’s record of marriage on October 29 hoping it might shed some light on their parents, but while I’m waiting, I’ve looked around online. Many online genealogies conclude that Nancy’s parents were William Evans and Sarah Hayes of Wake County, North Carolina although I haven’t seen the exact evidence that ties them all together.  I feel like I can’t establish that Nancy and Elijah are in Northampton County until I see the microfilm myself.  The book I mentioned earlier says that Elijah Gumbs Boon was born in Northampton County.  Nancy’s parents were supposed to be from Wake County, North Carolina.  I’m not putting them together just yet.  Is there some sort of land record I don’t know about?  A sale of land in Wake County? A purchase of land in Northampton County?  Are they close to each other? What are the histories of these two counties?

A quick Wikipedia search says Northampton County, NC was formed in 1741 from Bertie County, so it was definitely a county when Elijah Gumbs Boon was born in 1796 and when he married Nancy Evans in 1814.  Wikipedia also says Wake County was formed later, in 1771 from Cumberland, Johnston, and Orange Counties.  I don’t have any evidence yet that the majority of these researchers are wrong, but something doesn’t feel right.  It seems like a large jump from Wake County where William Evans died in 1823 and Northampton County where his alleged daughter married Elijah Gumbs Boon in 1814.  Plus, I’ve only seen the children of William Evans and Sarah Hayes of Wake County NC as 3 sons, Henderson, Daniel, and Enoch.

The counties also don’t border each other as you can see at this website, which corroborates the Wikipedia entries for the most part.  Yes, I could be wrong but something doesn’t add up for me yet.  I hope the microfilm from Family Search comes soon and can help me figure this out.

wake-and-northampton-counties-nc

 

 

Genealogy, Uncategorized

Sarah Evans Full Mitochondrial Sequence Match Updated

We finally received a mitochondrial DNA match on October 20th.  This person’s HVR1 and HVR2 results rolled in first, then the next day I was notified that it was a full sequence match!  Here’s a good explanation from Roberta Estes of DNA Explained on why this kind of match is significant: “Locations are extremely important when tracking mitochondrial DNA because if you match someone who is in the same area as your ancestor, then you’re close to finding your common ancestor. The records that may well prove the connection may be located in that geography as well. Some people are lucky enough to connect to a surname. Since they change every generation, the surname will likely be buried in the information of the other individual. You should ask them for their info as well, along with the areas where their ancestor lived. Don’t neglect sisters and who they married. Your ancestor’s sister may hold the key to your ancestry as well. I generally take my matches’ ancestor’s names and compare them to names in my Gedcom file to see what I find. It’s amazing how often I find something close geographically or sometimes I find their ancestor already listed as a sibling or niece or cousin of one of my ancestors. That’s powerful information.”

fms-v7-match-documentation
Our first mitochondrial DNA match. As you all know, I have been stuck on my furthest maternal line ancestor, Sarah Evans for a while. I know Sarah Evans was married to William Brummet in Chariton County, Missouri in 1827 and that the 1850 census for Livingston County, Missouri says she was from North Carolina. I even received a notification as the project administrator for Mothers of Missouri. This was super exciting: They are descendants of Nancy Evans who married Elijah Boon in Northampton County, North Carolina in 1814 before setting off for Missouri. Nancy Evans was born in October 1796 so there would have been about a 13-year gap between her and Sarah Evans. Nancy Evans’ parents were William Evans (sometimes William Evins) and Sarah Hayes. The match does not know Sarah Hayes’ mother.

UPDATE at the bottom, full match confirmed!  Nancy Boon/Nancy Evans and Sarah Brummett/Sarah Evans were sisters!

A cursory Google search for Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans, Missouri turns up this link, a short biography about Mrs. Harriet Bills (Harriet Boone) from the book, The History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri, 1886  mentions her parents “being Elijah and Nancy Boone, nee Evans. They were also both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in Northampton county, December 12, 1796, and by occupation was a farmer. He continued to live in the State of his birth until removing to Livingston county, Mo., in 1834. The mother was born October 12, 1796.”  A few pages before, it mentions William Wm. Brummett and Elijah Boon both living in Township 59, Ranges 24 and 25, respectively.  Our Sarah Evans and her husband William Brummett eventually end up in Livingston County.  This is where their daughter Mary Ann marries James Taylor.

This excerpt from the book History of Chariton and Howard Counties, Missouri page 459 notes Elijah Boone was one of the “old settlers” of Chariton County along with a Brummett.  This would put Elijah and Nancy Boon (Evans), and the Brummett Family in Chariton County prior to 1830.  Remember, Sarah Evans and William Brummett married in 1827 in Chariton County, Missouri.

brummett-and-boon-1830-chariton-co-mo
William Brummett, husband of Sarah Evans and Elijah Boon, husband of Nancy Evans in Chariton County, Missouri 1830.  FamilySearch

UPDATE!

Family Tree DNA’s help desk got back to me Monday, October 24 via Facebook to confirm that this is a full mitochondrial sequence match!  Sarah Evans and Nancy Evans are sisters!  When our display glitch is fixed I will add the mtDNA match picture here.  My mother also matches an AncestryDNA kit administered by user RossEddy1, both are descendants of Elijah Gumbs Boon and Nancy Evans.

ftdna-match-display-glitch
Full mitochondrial sequence match between Nancy Boon (Nancy Evans) and Sarah Brummett (Sarah Evans) confirmed!
fms-match-and-genealogical-info-evans
Family Tree DNA fixed it quickly.  This is the genealogical information sent to me by our match, this is the image I will use in our Ancestry.com family tree.