Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

C Romero Sauceda AncestryDNA
CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

CSDNA Ancestry Profile
CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.
Genealogy

“Uncle Jimmy” James Taylor

Died August 13, 1912, in Iola, Allen County, Kansas.

I received his death certificate from the Kansas Health Department today and received help finding his obituary.  I knew he was part of the IOOF in Cañon City, Colorado (his second wife Geraldine Denison and their son Samuel G. Taylor are buried in the city’s IOOF cemetery) and that he was active at some point in Iola, but it was unexpectedly relieving and heartwarming to see his funeral was well-attended by the local chapter.

james-taylor-death-certificate
James Taylor, son of Joseph Taylor and Jane Doss was born June 12, 1830, in Montgomery County, Missouri and died August 13, 1912, in Iola, Allen County, Kansas. He was Sarah Jane Taylor’s father; her mother was his first wife, Mary Ann Brummet.
james-taylor-obituary-iola-register-14-aug
James Taylor obituary in the Iola Register, August 14, 1912.
james-taylor-funeral-iola-register-15-aug
The funeral of James Taylor in the Iola Register, August 15, 1912.

 

Genealogy

Missouri First Families

My Missouri First Families certificate for Sarah Evans and William Brummet from the Missouri State Genealogical Association came in today!  As I’ve mentioned before, Sarah Evans had a sister, Nancy Evans, who married Elijah Gumbs Boon.  Their descendants would be eligible for the same certificate if any cousins are interested in pursuing it.  Also, obligatory link to the Mothers of Missouri DNA Project (MoM).

Genealogy

Mom’s Shared Ancestor Hints and NADs

Because I should probably write something every once in a while.

She has 11 Shared Ancestor Hints:

  • Two share Candelario Garza Martinez and Felicitas Cantú
    • Candelario Garza Martinez born about 1834 in Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico to Froilan de la Garza and Rita Martinez
    • We don’t know when or where Felicitas Cantú was born, but the couple ended up in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico as seen on my ancestor Francisca Garza’s baptism record.
    • One match is a known cousin, the other through the couple’s daughter, Candelaria Garza.
  • Three share Maria Guadalupe Martín, and only Maria Guadalupe Martín because each is listed with a different husband and children.
Manuel Urioste.jpg
In our tree: This is from the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 published by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.  It shows Manuel Urioste’s wife Maria Guadalupe Martín has died so he goes on to marry Maria Felipe Montoya.  Manuel Urioste and Maria Guadalupe Martín’s sons Feliz Urioste and Aniceto Urioste were the witnesses.

New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 a publication by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.

st-francis-cathedral-santa-fe
My son and I in front of St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2016
  • FINALLY one descendant of William Brummet and Sarah Evans through their daughter Susan Frances Brummitt.
    • Susan Frances Brummitt was born 1836 in Grundy County, Missouri and married John William Karr in 1857.
  • Two share Juan Ygnacio Armijo and Maria Eulalia Sandoval
    • We don’t know where Juan Ygnacio Armijo or Maria Eulalia Sandoval were born, but their son (our ancestor) Ruperto Armijo was born in 1826 in Pena Blanca, Sandoval County, New Mexico.
    • One match is through their son Antonio Armijo born about 1834, the other is through their daughter Maria Estefanita Armijo born about 1822.
  • The last three have private trees so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mom is up to three New Ancestor Discoveries who I thought maybe could bee in-laws but so far I haven’t been able to place them.

  • Richard Scott and Rebecca Ann Cooper
    • Richard Scott was born in 1807 in Virginia.
    • He married Rebecca Ann Cooper in Virginia 1838.
  • James Harris born about 1811 in Bedford County, Virginia [ Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 on Ancestry]

mom-nads

Genealogy

A Quaker in the War of 1812?

UPDATE: It was probably a son named Henry.

I’m writing this mostly to make sense of it, sorry if it jumps around a lot.  I met with a genealogist recently at my local Family History Library and she gave me some really good suggestions about researching Henry Evans.

As you already know, I found him on the 1810 census in Northampton County, NC.

On this record, he was between the ages of 26 and 44, which would mean he was probably born between the years 1766 and 1784.  He had a wife, 2 boys, and 3 girls at the time.  If this is the right Henry, Nancy was probably the girl between 10-15 years old which would make sense if she married Elijah Gumbs Boon in 1815.  My Sarah may have been one of the girls under 10 as we think she was born around 1809.

henry-evans-1810-census
Henry Evans on the 1810 Census, 7 people in the household, total: Henry Evans, his wife, 2 boys, and 3 girls.

Anyway, based on the timeframe, the genealogist mentioned I should check the records for the War of 1812.  I found a pay voucher for Henry Evans of the Northampton Militia at digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll7/id/3863 and also mention of him in the muster rolls from the book Muster Rolls of the Soldiers of the War of 1812: detached from the militia of North Carolina, in 1812 and 1814 Henry Evans page 20 #79 https://archive.org/details/musterrollsofsol00nort .  I did not find a pension record for him.

henry-evans-war-of-1812-pay-voucher
Henry Evans pay voucher for service in the War of 1812. NC ECHO.

I searched Ancestry with this new information and saw a Henry Evans in the Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935.  Of course, I got way too excited for someone who knows better.  Would a Quaker have participated in the War of 1812?  I didn’t think so. So I was surprised when I Googled “Henry Evans Northampton County NC Quakers” and the first document to come up included the line,

“In First Month, 1886, there is a recorded minute to the effect that William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliott, and Henry Evans were not disowned for volunteering their services in the army.”

Wow!  A couple of prior paragraphs talk about the War of 1812 so I felt like the genealogy angels were my tech support at the moment.  Though, when I read the year 1886 I was a little bummed because if he was born even at the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he would have been 102 years old, and therefore, probably not the guy I was looking for.  I checked the Ancestry records and found the record mentioned in the pdf for the year 1866, not 1886.  If he were born at the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he’d be about 82 which is more probable than 102.

henry-evans-1866-quaker-meeting-notes
Quaker Meeting Records 1866, Rich Square Meeting in which William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliot, and Henry Evans get to retain their membership.

One of the Quaker Meeting Notes from 1843 lists his wife as Mary, and “six of their children, namely James, Sarah J[?], Martha A, Celia E, Christian, and Henry”.  I might be reading too much into “six of their children” but at this time Sarah and Nancy would have been in Missouri.  If he were born in the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he’d have been about 59 years old.  He can be 59 and still have 6 kids, right?  Especially if he remarried?

henry-evans-family-1843-meeting
Quaker Meeting Notes from 1843, Northampton County, lists Henry Evans’ wife as Mary, and “six of their children, namely James, Sarah J[?], Martha A, Celia E, Christian, and Henry”.
Henry Evans with his wife Mary and 3 of his children: James, 21 (born about 1829), Martha, 16 (born about 1834), and Celia, 14 (born about 1836) are on the 1850 census in Northampton County, NC.  These children were born well after the Henry Evans family on the 1810 census.  Still, it is possible that this could be the same Henry but with a different wife.  I assume a different wife because she was between ages 26-44 years old on the 1810 census, so if she was the youngest possible, 26, she would have been born around 1784 making her about 52 when the youngest child, Celia, was born in 1836.  Celia would have been born about 9 years after my Sarah Evans married William Brummet.

According to the 1850 census, he was about 62 years old, born in 1788.  That would have made him 22 on the 1810 census, where he is clearly marked as being between the ages of 26-44 years old.  The general rule is to stick with the information from the earliest census, so it is possible he was the youngest age available, 26, at the time making the age given in the 1850 census younger by 4 years.  Not impossible.  Also, we have Nancy Evans born around 1796.  If we add back the 4 years taken from the 1850 census, Henry Evans would have been born around 1784, making him 29 during his service in the War of 1812, 12 years old when Nancy was born (Although I find this date suspicious because her husband Elijah was born 12 Dec 1796 and Nancy is said to have been born 12 Oct 1796, what are the chances they were both born on the 12th day of the month, same year?), and 26 on the 1810 census.  There was a female 10-15 years of age on the 1810 census, if it were Nancy she would have been born 1795-1800, so I guess year-wise that is close to what we know about her.  The 1810 census pretty much says if Henry Evans had a child born around 1800, he could have been anywhere between 16 to 34 years of age (He could have been born 1766-1784 according to his age bracket).

henry-evans-1850-census
Henry Evans 1850 census Northampton County with wife Mary, and three of their children: James, Martha, and Celia.

So how can I tell if the 1810 Census Henry Evans is also the 1850 census Henry Evans?  I went back to the 1866 record of the three men who were allowed to retain their Friends (Quaker) membership despite their participation in the War of 1812.  The three men named were William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliot, and Henry Evans.  Were they in the census for Northampton County back in 1810?  That would make it more likely that they were friends in addition to being Friends (punny!).  I found William Copeland on page 7 of 44, but no Thomas.  There was an Elliot household, though, run by Sarah Elliot.

william-copeland-1810-census
William Copeland on the 1810 census of Northampton County, NC. William Copeland was one of the three men, along with Henry Evans, mentioned in the 1866 Quaker Meeting Records for being allowed to retain their membership despite their participation in the War of 1812.

Another name from the first Quaker record in which I found Henry Evans, in 1843, mentions a Josiah Outland.  Truthfully, the name Outland stood out to me because of the Outlander book series.  And Josiah isn’t a common name anymore so I went to see if I could find him on the 1810 census, he was there he is on page 29 of the Northampton census.

josiah-outland-1810-census
Josiah Outland on the 1810 census of Northampton County, NC. He was mentioned in the 1843 Quaker Meeting Records I found pertaining to Henry Evans. Josiah just sounds like a Quaker.

So, what do you think?  Is this the same Henry Evans?

Genealogy

Marriage Bond Between Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans, Northampton County NC

There wasn’t any extra information, why does this always happen to me?  It reads:

“We, the undersigned, do hereby acknowledge ourselves indebted to his Excellency, Wm Hawkins Esquire, Governer, &c. and his successors office, in the sum of five hundred pounds. But to be void on condition that there is no lawful cause obstruct a marriage between Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans for whom a liceace [?] no issues.

Witness, our hands and seals, this 17th day of Feb A.D. 1814

In presence of Tom Hughes                                             Henry -x- Evans his mark”

 

nancy-evans-marriage-bond-with-stamp
Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans 17 FEB 1814 Northampton County, North Carolina.  Bondsman Henry Evans.  Tom Hughes was a clerk who appears in many marriage records around this time in Northampton County.

 

Genealogy

Bondsman Henry Evans

In my last post, I told you about FamilySearch’s microfiche containing a record of Nancy Evans’ marriage to Elijah Gumbs Boon.  In it, two individuals were listed who I thought might help me in my search for the parents of Nancy Evans: witness Tom Hughes and bondsman Henry Evans.

Several online trees list William Evans and Sarah Hayes as the parents of Nancy Evans, but I have not found a conclusive link yet. One of the online genealogies I started with was another WordPress blog called Native American Roots that mentions William Evans and Sarah Hayes, and that William was the son of Major Evans (1733-1814), son of Charles Evans (1696-1760), son of Morris Evans the elder (1665-1739). A helpful person in the Evans DNA Project at Family Tree DNA pointed me to Deloris William’s well-known Evans of North Carolina genealogy page, which has an extensive section concerning Morris the elder.

However, I couldn’t reconcile this family being from the Orange/Granville/Wake counties area while William and Sarah were living in Northampton County.

northampton-and-wake-counties-nc-1811
Northampton County NC 1741 (Nancy Evans marries Elijah Gumbs Boon 1814) Granville County NC established 1746 Orange County NC established 1752 Wake County NC established 1771

There just doesn’t seem to be an obvious connection. So I searched for Henry Evans on Deloris’ page to see if maybe he was the connection other Nancy Evans/Elijah Gumbs Boon researchers were finding.  I did find a Henry Evans:

henry-evans-1810-wake-county-nc
Deloris Williams Evans of North Carolina genealogy page- Henry Evans 1810, Wake County North Carolina

I went to FamilySearch to find this Henry Evans on the 1810 census in Wake County only to find the 1810 and 1820 census for Wake County were lost.  I found another Henry Evans on the 1810 census for Northampton County, though, who I believe is most likely the Henry Evans bondsman on Nancy and Elijah Gumbs Boon’s marriage record and a different person than the Henry Evans in Wake County NC in 1810.

henry-evans-1810-northampton-nc-census