Genealogy

Jose Froilan de la Garza Valdes of Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico b. 1803

Since I haven’t been able to make any breakthroughs researching Froilan/Froylan de la Garza (father of Candelario de la Garza) directly, I went back to look at his first child, Jose Ysidro Garza Martinez’s baptism record.

Jose Ysidro Garza Martinez baptism FS
Jose Ysidro Garza Martinez baptism 18 May 1830, Santiago Apostol, Santiago, Nuevo Leon,Mexico. Son of Froylan Garza and Maria Rita Martinez. Godparents listed as Antonio Escamilla and Maria Josefa de la Garza.

It names Antonio Escamilla and Maria Josefa de la Garza as the padrinos (godparents), so I researched Maria Josefa.

Maria Josefa de la Garza and Jose Antonio Escamilla were married in Santiago Apostol, Santiago, Nuevo Leon, Mexico in April of 1826. The record says her parents were Anastacio de la Garza and Maria Ignacia Valdez. 

Maria Josefa de la Garza Antonio Escamilla marriage 1826
Maria Josefa de la Garza marriage to Jose Antonio Escamilla, 1826. Her parents were Anastacio de la Garza and Maria Ygnacia Valdes.

Looking at baptism records naming this couple as the parents, I found one for a Jose Froilan Garza Valdes in Santiago Apostol, Santiago, Nuevo Leon, Mexico on 10 October 1803. It says he was “Español”.

Jose Froylan Garza Valdes baptism 1803
Jose Froilan de la Garza Valdes baptism in 1803, same parents as Maria Josefa, Anastacio Garza and Maria Ygnacia Valdes. Padrinos Jose Cosme Valdes and Maria Manuela Garza.

Compared to Maria Josefa de la Garza’s baptism in 1810, Santiago Apostol, Santiago, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.  It is also noted on her baptism record that she was “Española”.

Maria Josefa de la Garza baptism img 1810
Maria Josefa de la Garza’s baptism in 1810. Parents Anastacio de la Garza and Maria Ygnacia Valdes. Padrinos Simon Villaton (?) and Manuela Gonzales

I think Maria Josefa de la Garza and Froilan de la Garza were siblings, and that their parents were Anastacio de la Garza and Maria Ignacia Valdez.

Full disclosure: A cousin has another suspected Froilan Garza (https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/M2N5-5JK) attached to our Family Search Tree, but that Froilan’s wife is listed as Maria Antonia Salazar and he was from Vallecillo, Nuevo Leon instead of Santiago.  This all is important to note as we know our Candelario‘s mother was Maria Rita Martinez, not Maria Antonia Salazar, and that Candelario was born and baptized in Santiago as this family I’ve shared here.

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Genealogy, Immigration

Benito Juarez

Benito Juarez was my paternal grandmother Amelia Juarez Rangel’s father.  I’ve previously found him on the 1940 census in the household of his parents, Miguel Juarez and Juana Conde.

It appears Miguel Juarez and Juana Conde had six children:

Pedro Juarez 1910-1935 married Micaela Yzaguirre

Teresa Juarez 1911-1927

Benito Juarez born about 1918, married Maria Rangel

Anna Juarez born 1920-1960 married Chavo Rosendez

Gertrudes Juarez 1924-1960 married Yzaguirre

Luz Juarez born about 1928

 

Teresa Juarez death certificate
Teresa Juarez’ 1927 death certificate shows she was born in Monterrey, Mexico. Her parents were Miguel Juarez and Juana Conde. The informant was Antonio Juarez.

 

Pedro Juarez death certificate
Pedro Juarez died of tuberculosis in a sanatorium in 1935. He was also born in Monterrey, Mexico according to his death certificate.

 

Anna and Gertrudes both passed away in 1960 and both of their death certificates state they were born in Texas.

 

Juana Conde death certificate
It appears Miguel Juarez was the informant on his wife Juana Conde’s 1947 death certificate. Which state in Mexico she was from is not listed. Her parents are named as Carmen Conde and Paula Romero.

 

There is a death certificate for a Miguel Juarez in San Benito, Cameron, Texas in 1963, but he is estimated to be about 88 years old at the time of his death.  If he were born around 1892 as it says on the 1940 census, he’d have been about 71 years old if he died in 1963.  The thing that makes me think it might be him is that the informant is Luz Juarez and that he is widowed.

Miguel Juarez death certificate

 

Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

C Romero Sauceda AncestryDNA
CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

CSDNA Ancestry Profile
CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.
Genealogy, Immigration

Bernardo Sauceda or Sanseda or Salsado, Senior

I’ve been frustrated with being unable to get further on Bernardo Sauceda Sr. since seeing the record of his marriage to Francisca Garza in Zapata County, Texas, 1900. One of my maternal uncle’s Y-DNA37 matches (distance 4, 69.98% chance they share a common ancestor within 8 generations) is a Mr. SANCEDO, so I went to FamilySearch and searched “Bernardo Sancedo” because, well, why the hell not?

The death certificate for a boy named Dolores Sauseda came up, improperly transcribed as Sancedo (luck!). Parents were Bernardo Sauceda (properly spelled) and Francisca Garzo. 

Dolores Sauceda death cert
Dolores Sauceda death certificate, May 17, 1927, in Burleson County, Texas. Parents Bernardo Sauceda and Francisca Garza.

 

I entered these criteria and found a death certificate for Bernardo Sauceda under the name Bernardo Sanseda who was born in 1864 in Mexico and died in the same Texas county as the boy Dolores on July 5, 1935. His wife is listed as Francisca Sanseda.

 

Bernardo Sanseda death cert
Bernardo Sauceda Sr. death certificate July 5, 1935, in Burleson County, Texas. He was born in Mexico around 1864.

 

Since the son Dolores died in 1927 and Bernardo Sauceda Sr. died in 1935, both in Burleson County, Texas, I searched the 1930 census page by page for them.

The family was there under the name Salsado, and many of their first names were written incorrectly as well so it was no wonder we couldn’t find them on previous census records.

The names should be Bernardo Sauceda, Francsica (Garza), Felipe, Jose, Cruz, Rosa, Bernardo, Ysidro, and Paul (Paulino maybe).

 

Bernardo Sauceda family 1930 census info
Bernardo Sauceda Sr. and family on the 1930 census. Appears as “Benard Salsado”.

 

Now we know Bernardo Sauceda Sr. was born about 1864 in Mexico and died July 5, 1935, in Burleson County, Texas.  The census says both he and Francisca immigrated to the United States in 1900, though I have not seen immigration records for them thus far.  The Texas immigration records start in 1903 or something like that on FamilySearch.  They were married in Zapata County, Texas February 2, 1900, so I’m not sure if the arrival year is correct for either of them.