Genealogy, Immigration

Benito Juarez

Benito Juarez was my paternal grandmother Amelia Juarez Rangel’s father.  I’ve previously found him on the 1940 census in the household of his parents, Miguel Juarez and Juana Conde.

It appears Miguel Juarez and Juana Conde had six children:

Pedro Juarez 1910-1935 married Micaela Yzaguirre

Teresa Juarez 1911-1927

Benito Juarez born about 1918, married Maria Rangel

Anna Juarez born 1920-1960 married Chavo Rosendez

Gertrudes Juarez 1924-1960 married Yzaguirre

Luz Juarez born about 1928

 

Teresa Juarez death certificate
Teresa Juarez’ 1927 death certificate shows she was born in Monterrey, Mexico. Her parents were Miguel Juarez and Juana Conde. The informant was Antonio Juarez.

 

Pedro Juarez death certificate
Pedro Juarez died of tuberculosis in a sanatorium in 1935. He was also born in Monterrey, Mexico according to his death certificate.

 

Anna and Gertrudes both passed away in 1960 and both of their death certificates state they were born in Texas.

 

Juana Conde death certificate
It appears Miguel Juarez was the informant on his wife Juana Conde’s 1947 death certificate. Which state in Mexico she was from is not listed. Her parents are named as Carmen Conde and Paula Romero.

 

There is a death certificate for a Miguel Juarez in San Benito, Cameron, Texas in 1963, but he is estimated to be about 88 years old at the time of his death.  If he were born around 1892 as it says on the 1940 census, he’d have been about 71 years old if he died in 1963.  The thing that makes me think it might be him is that the informant is Luz Juarez and that he is widowed.

Miguel Juarez death certificate

 

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Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
Genealogy, Immigration

Maria Rangel Juarez Partida

Maria Rangel, my father’s maternal grandmother, was born in Texas in 1924.  At some point, she married and had a family with Benito Juarez, then moved to Arizona between 1954-1956.  Maria Rangel divorced Benito Juarez in 1964 and married Federico Partida.  She died in Phoenix in 1982 but was living in Coolidge, Arizona at the time.

maria-rangel-juarez-divorce-oct1964
Maria Rangel divorces Benito Juarez in October 1964, Pinal County, Arizona.

I was able to order her death certificate and am so glad I did because ith showed her parents were Hipolito Rangel and Estefana de la Cruz.  I was also able to find a record of their entry into the United States in 1910.  The manifest lists just about all of the people entering as living in Monterrey, but (#20) Hipolito and (#21) Estefana listed their closest relative as being Hipolito’s sister Santos Rangel as living in Matehuala, San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

maria-rangel-death-certificate
Maria Rangel’s death certificate showing her parents, Hipolito Rangel and Estefana de la Cruz, 1982.
hipolito-rangel-estefana-de-la-cruz-border-crossing-1910
Maria Rangel’s parents, Hipolito Rangel (#20) and Estefana de la Cruz (#21) entering Hildalgo, Texas from Mexico in 1910. Santos Rangel is listed as Hipolito’s sister living in Matehuala, San Luis Potosí, Mexico.
Genealogy

Mom’s Shared Ancestor Hints and NADs

Because I should probably write something every once in a while.

She has 11 Shared Ancestor Hints:

  • Two share Candelario Garza Martinez and Felicitas Cantú
    • Candelario Garza Martinez born about 1834 in Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico to Froilan de la Garza and Rita Martinez
    • We don’t know when or where Felicitas Cantú was born, but the couple ended up in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico as seen on my ancestor Francisca Garza’s baptism record.
    • One match is a known cousin, the other through the couple’s daughter, Candelaria Garza.
  • Three share Maria Guadalupe Martín, and only Maria Guadalupe Martín because each is listed with a different husband and children.
Manuel Urioste.jpg
In our tree: This is from the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 published by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.  It shows Manuel Urioste’s wife Maria Guadalupe Martín has died so he goes on to marry Maria Felipe Montoya.  Manuel Urioste and Maria Guadalupe Martín’s sons Feliz Urioste and Aniceto Urioste were the witnesses.

New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 a publication by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.

st-francis-cathedral-santa-fe
My son and I in front of St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2016
  • FINALLY one descendant of William Brummet and Sarah Evans through their daughter Susan Frances Brummitt.
    • Susan Frances Brummitt was born 1836 in Grundy County, Missouri and married John William Karr in 1857.
  • Two share Juan Ygnacio Armijo and Maria Eulalia Sandoval
    • We don’t know where Juan Ygnacio Armijo or Maria Eulalia Sandoval were born, but their son (our ancestor) Ruperto Armijo was born in 1826 in Pena Blanca, Sandoval County, New Mexico.
    • One match is through their son Antonio Armijo born about 1834, the other is through their daughter Maria Estefanita Armijo born about 1822.
  • The last three have private trees so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mom is up to three New Ancestor Discoveries who I thought maybe could bee in-laws but so far I haven’t been able to place them.

  • Richard Scott and Rebecca Ann Cooper
    • Richard Scott was born in 1807 in Virginia.
    • He married Rebecca Ann Cooper in Virginia 1838.
  • James Harris born about 1811 in Bedford County, Virginia [ Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 on Ancestry]

mom-nads

Genealogy

Who was Federico Partida? Another Marriage Mystery, San Benito, Texas

Ancestry now has a record of my paternal grandparents’ marriage in Yuma, Pinal County, 1958.  I was surprised by this because I always assumed they met and married in Texas and because my grandmother was 16 years old (!) when she married my mysterious grandfather.  Remember, he shed his name when he came to the United States and Amelia lent him a name from her family tree.  I wonder why they went all the way to Yuma to get married?  They lived in Mesa at the time.

az-yuma-marriage-record-amelia-juarez
My paternal grandparents’ marriage certificate from 1958, Yuma, Pinal County, Arizona. Amelia Juarez Rangel was born in San Benito, Cameron County, Texas in 1941 to Maria Teresa Rangel and Benito Juarez.

One of the witnesses was Maria Rangel, I think that was her mother who appears on the 1940 census in Cameron County, Texas, right outside of San Benito.  The other witness was someone named Federico Partida who I was able to find on the same 1940 census of Cameron County, Texas, right outside of San Benito.  Interesting.

miguel-juarez-household
Miguel Juarez with wife Juana Conde and children Gertrudes, Luz, Benito, Maria (Rangel, daughter in law), Anna, Chavo Rozendez (son in law), grandsons Eduardo and Narcisso, Juan Conde (nephew) and Irma Conde (niece). 1940 Census of Cameron County, Texas right outside of San Benito.
mauricia-partida-household-1940-cam-co-tx
Federico Partida in the household of Mauricia Partida with Nasario, Pablo, and Tomas Partida. 1940 Census of Cameron County, Texas, right outside of San Benito.
Genealogy

Mitochondrial Haplogroup C Native American

My paternal grandfather’s Full Mitochondrial Sequence results came in yesterday, his haplogroup is C1c5, which Roberta Estes included in her list of provisional Native American haplogroups Extrapolated from Anzick match results.  I have previously written about my paternal grandfather’s high amount of Native American DNA.

1-paternal-grandpa-mtdna-results
Paternal grandfather’s full mitochondrial sequence results are haplogroup C1c5 Native American

2-paternal-grandpa-mtdna-ancestral-originsHe has 2 perfect, distance 0 mtDNA matches among 14, one is Mr. Raymundo Linares. I wouldn’t usually share a match’s name, but in this case, he already has a deep mitochondrial genealogy out there published by Crispin Rendon. Mr. Linares’ furthest maternal ancestor was a woman named Josefa Gonzalez born about 1620 in Huichapan, Hidalgo, Mexico. My grandfather is likely not a descendant of Josefa herself because her children were born in Nuevo Leon, but Hidalgo borders Tlaxcala and that might is a clue to focus on the Hidalgo/Tlaxcala area outside of Mexico City.  A huge THANK YOU! to all those who do this very neglected DNA test, especially for full sequence results.

3-raymundo-arturo-linares
One of 2 of his distance 0 matches, the furthest known ancestor is from Hidalgo, Mexico which borders Tlaxcala.
Genealogy

Native American DNA

I’ve mentioned my paternal grandparents on this blog before.  My grandmother on that side passed away a while back and I regret not asking her more about her life while she was alive although there was a good chance she might not have told me anything.  My grandfather is still alive and doing relatively well, so I decided to ask him if I could get a DNA sample to send to Family Tree DNA.  He agreed, but it was totally one of those “this is your only chance he won’t say yes again” kind of things.

His results came back early and revealed that he is Native American.  Pretty much just Native American.  I’m not sure if this is what he and my grandmother were hiding, but he hinted that he didn’t want to discuss the results.  I was pretty lucky to have obtained the sample.  All he’ll tell me is that he was born in Tlaxcala, Mexico.  I figured out on my own that he is using a fake name.  He confirmed this and said he dropped his Native American name a long time ago.

grandpa-my-origins
Native American My Origins results – Family Tree DNA
clovis-anzick
Clovis Anzick-1 came up as a cousin match for him, not sure what to think about the data set being included at FTDNA.

 

mdlp-gpa-j
MDLP World-22 Native American results at GEDmatch

Paternal grandfather’s DNA analysis using MDLP World-22 at GEDmatch. He is overwhelmingly Native American. Largest percentages:

Mesoamerican 46.03%
North Amerind 31.05%
South American Amerind 12.26%

mdlp-gpa-j-pops
Native American mixed mode population sharing results MDLP World-22 at GEDmatch

 

His mixed-mode population sharing results stood out to me because his best fit populations are a mix of North and Central/South American.  He has 162 Family Finder matches and I noticed 5 matches with what appears to be exclusively Ecuadorian ancestry and 4 with Guatemalan ancestry.  Two of the Guatemalan matches were adoptees, one was somewhere between a 2nd and 3rd cousin match.

And while I have your attention…  Click here