Ancient DNA, Genealogy, Uncategorized

mtDNA V7 in Dr. Knipper’s “Female Exogamy and Gene Pool Diversification”

The full title of the article is Female exogamy and gene pool diversification at the transition from the Final Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in central Europe published 19 September 2017.

One day I was looking at my grandmother’s submission to mitochondrial haplogroup V7 on PhyloTree.org and noticed three “Germany-ancient” samples credited to Dr. Knipper; that’s how I found her article.

Dolores Romero mtdna phylotree
Maternal grandmother Dolores Romero’s mitochondrial DNA sample highlighted in orange.

It is interesting because she and her research team extracted isotope ratio data to determine whether the individuals were local or non-local to the site, in addition to genomic data from the samples found.

The three V7 individuals are from the Königsbrunn, Obere Kreuzstraße (OBKR) site.

F1.largeKnipper
From Knipper et. al 2017 “Female Exogamy and Gene Pool Diversification”. the three V7 individuals were found at the Konigsbrunn-OBKR site in Bavaria, Germany.

I’m not exactly sure of the ages of the samples, but they were labeled Early Bronze Age by the research group.  I wondered if Dr. Knipper and her group considered the V7 samples local or not, so I emailed her to ask.  She is really nice and helpful by the way!  I was nervous because I’m not very familiar with anthropological terminology and was concerned about asking something that might be very obviously stated in the article for those who are familiar with the terminology.

We exchanged a few emails and she gave me permission to paraphrase her answer:

Based on strontium and oxygen isotope ratios found in their teeth, the V7 individuals are considered local by the research group, and were found in the Lech River Valley, Bavaria, Germany. Dr. Knipper did, however, say we can’t be 100% sure they are local because there is a possibility the isotope ratios happen to appear local by chance since the ratio is not exclusive to this area.

Additional note: There was an older paper with a different V7 individual found related to the Novosvobodnaya Culture.  I remember the big splash that paper made when it was published.  Professionals, please weigh-in on the two findings and their implications on the geographical origin of haplogroup V7, please!

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Genealogy

Found! Children of William Hays and Catherine Lewis

As stated in previous posts, James Warr’s estate papers mention a Winifred Hays, orphaned daughter of William Hays, who we know to be the husband of Catherine Lewis. Through Catherine’s father Joshua Lewis’ estate papers, we also know that Catherine Lewis married William Hays and that both died and left behind many children.

James Warr Estate Petition by Willie and Winifred Hays
Winifred Hays, daughter of William Hays and Catherine Lewis mentioned in the estate of James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis, 1797, Northampton County, North Carolina. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99CN-2421

Joshua Lewis Estate Records Catherine Lewis Hayes
Catherine Lewis’ father Joshua Lewis’ estate documents filed by Millie Lewis and her second husband James Warr in Northampton County, NC in 1788.  The document says that Catherine Lewis was married to William Hayes but that he had since passed and that the couple had five children. [FamilySearch]
Searching through the guardianship papers of Northampton County, North Carolina available on FamilySearch I have found documents granting guardianship of the following minor orphans to James Warr, second husband of Millie Mildred Lewis (after Daniel Drewry):

  • Fanny Hays
  • John Hays
  • Patty Hays
  • Samuel Hays
  • Sarah Hays (later married Henry Evans)
  • Winifred Hays
Fanny Hays Guardianship
Guardianship of Fanny Hays granted to James Warr, 2nd husband of Mildred “Millie” Lewis. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRP3-9MH7
John Hays Guardianship
Guardianship of John Hays, son of William Hays and Catherine Lewis granted to James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis March 1789. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RP3-99PC
Patty Hays Guardianship
Guardianship of Patty Hays, daughter of William Hays and Catherine Lewis granted to James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis March 1789. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RP3-99PC
Samuel Hays Guardianship
Guardianship of Samuel Hays, son of William Hays and Catherine Lewis granted to James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis March 1789. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRP3-9MH7

Sarah Hays Guardianship to James Warr
Guardianship of Sarah Hays, daughter of William Hays and Catherine Lewis granted to James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis March 1789. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRP3-9MH7
Winifred Hays Guardianship
Guardianship of Winifred Hays, daughter of William Hays and Catherine Lewis granted to James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis March 1789. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RP3-99PC
Genealogy

James Warr and Millie Lewis Granted Guardianship of Winifred Hays

Daughter of William Hays and Catherine Lewis, Millie’s sister.  Millie and Catherine were daughters of Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston. From my last post on this family, the previous documents suggest William Hays and Catherine Lewis died at or near the same time and left behind five or seven children.

Now we know William Hays had a “considerable personal estate” upon his death but died intestate.  The document states Winifred was entitled to one-seventh part of her father’s estate.  On a side note, I find it interesting Winifred Hays went on to marry a man named William Hays.

That’s all for now, have a Happy New Year!

James Warr Estate Petition by Willie and Winifred Hays
Winifred Hays, daughter of William Hays and Catherine Lewis mentioned in the estate of James Warr, husband of Millie Lewis, 1797, Northampton County, North Carolina. FamilySearch https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99CN-2421
Genealogy

Tentative mtDNA Connection to Martha Marston and Joshua Lewis of Virginia

We have two perfect mitochondrial DNA matches.  One connected my furthest known maternal line ancestor, Sarah Evans, to her parents Henry Evans and Sarah Hayes by way of her sister Nancy Evans of Northampton County, North Carolina (Nancy married Elijah Gumbs Boon).  I just need to figure out the parents of Sarah Hayes who was likely born in Virginia, particularly her mother.

The second connection is through Mildred “Millie” Lewis b. 1738 d. 1801, wife of Daniel Drewry/Drury, both of Virginia. Her parents were Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston.  Given the DNA evidence, I have a strong hunch these families are connected through the maternal line even though I don’t have quite enough of a paper trail yet to firmly connect them.  I just need to figure out a daughter who could have been the mother of Sarah Hayes.

Children of Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston (from Marston Book/Marston Plantation by Barry Lee Marston):

  • James Lewis, b. 05 Sep 1726; d. 1815
  • Anne Lewis, b. 08 Nov 1727; d. 1727
  • Edmund Lewis, b. 20 Jan 1728/29
  • Joanna Lewis, b. 1730; m. John Vaughn; d. 1797
  • CATHERINE LEWIS, b. 1732; m. WILLIAM HAYES; d. 1789
  • Sarah Lewis, b. 1734
  • Martha Lewis, b. 1736; d. 1788
  • Mildred Lewis, b. 1738; d. 1801 (married Daniel Drewry)

Marston Book

It is important to note Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston’s son James Lewis eventually ends up in Northampton NC with his family (from the Genealogy Web Page for Charles E. Lewis: Descendants of Lewis ap David of Cardiganshire, Wales):

Descendants of Lewis ap David of Cardiganshire, Wales

I would love to know more about Judie King of Texas and her letter #293!

WGT mtDNA Match
Our 2nd mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) match that links our maternal line to Mildred Lewis through her sister Catherine Lewis, and ultimately Martha Marston and her mysterious mother Ann, wife of John Marston.