Genealogy

Catherine Lewis of Middlesex County, Virginia married to William Hayes

In my last post, I wrote about Barry Lee Marston’s very helpful book Marsten Book/Marston Plantation.  It turns out that Barry is a relative!

Triangulator extension Marston
Barry Lee Marston, his relative, and my grandmother share two segments above 7 cM on chromosome 4. This was calculated using Goran Runfeldt’s new Triangulator App.

About Goran’s app

Barry is so nice and very helpful; he put me in touch with Judie King who is also awesome and helpful.  I felt a little apprehensive since, as I mentioned in my email, I’ve heavily used their work to help me leaf-out this branch of the family tree once I established a tie to Millie Lewis’ family in Northampton County, North Carolina.  All props and respect to Barry Marston and Judie King!  Thank you!

I haven’t connected Catherine Lewis to Sally Hayes on paper quite yet, BUT thanks to Barry and Judie I have found confirmation that Catherine Lewis did marry and have children with William Hayes.  She pointed me to Catherine’s father Joshua Lewis’ estate documents filed by Millie Lewis and her second husband James Warr in Northampton County in 1788.  The document says that Catherine Lewis was married to William Hayes but that they had since passed together and that the couple had five children.

Joshua Lewis Estate Records Catherine Lewis Hayes
Catherine Lewis’ father Joshua Lewis’ estate documents filed by Millie Lewis and her second husband James Warr in Northampton County, NC in 1788.  The document says that Catherine Lewis was married to William Hayes but that he had since passed and that the couple had five children. [FamilySearch]
From what I understand, Joshua Lewis died in 1759 in Southampton County, Virginia and that’s where his estate went to probate in 1760.  That makes me wonder if Catherine Lewis and William Hayes died in Southampton County as well.  How did Sally Hayes, if she is the daughter of Catherine Lewis and William Hayes, end up in Greensville County, VA in 1790 to marry Henry Evans?

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Genealogy

Tentative mtDNA Connection to Martha Marston and Joshua Lewis of Virginia

*Unconfirmed on paper as of Oct 16, 2017*

Just saying.  We have two perfect mitochondrial DNA matches.  One connected my furthest known maternal line ancestor, Sarah Evans, to her parents Henry Evans and Sarah Hayes by way of her sister Nancy Evans of Northampton County, North Carolina (Nancy married Elijah Gumbs Boon).  I just need to figure out the parents of Sarah Hayes who was likely born in Virginia, particularly her mother.

The second connection is through Mildred “Millie” Lewis b. 1738 d. 1801, wife of Daniel Drewry/Drury, both of Virginia. Her parents were Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston.  Given the DNA evidence, I have a strong hunch these families are connected through the maternal line even though I don’t have quite enough of a paper trail yet to firmly connect them.  I just need to figure out a daughter who could have been the mother of Sarah Hayes.

Children of Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston (from Marston Book/Marston Plantation by Barry Lee Marston):

  • James Lewis, b. 05 Sep 1726; d. 1815
  • Anne Lewis, b. 08 Nov 1727; d. 1727
  • Edmund Lewis, b. 20 Jan 1728/29
  • Joanna Lewis, b. 1730; m. John Vaughn; d. 1797
  • CATHERINE LEWIS, b. 1732; m. WILLIAM HAYES; d. 1789
  • Sarah Lewis, b. 1734
  • Martha Lewis, b. 1736; d. 1788
  • Mildred Lewis, b. 1738; d. 1801 (married Daniel Drewry)

Marston Book

It is important to note Joshua Lewis and Martha Marston’s son James Lewis eventually ends up in Northampton NC with his family (from the Genealogy Web Page for Charles E. Lewis: Descendants of Lewis ap David of Cardiganshire, Wales):

Descendants of Lewis ap David of Cardiganshire, Wales

I would love to know more about Judie King of Texas and her letter #293!

WGT mtDNA Match
Our 2nd mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) match that links our maternal line to Mildred Lewis through her sister Catherine Lewis, and ultimately Martha Marston and her mysterious mother Ann, wife of John Marston.
Genealogy

Evans 1789 Personal Tax List Greensville County Virginia

Tax list from Binns Genealogy (“1790” Census, reconstructed.  Index)

People listed on the 1790 marriage record:

Henry Evans

Evans 1789 Personal A Tax List
Henry Evans on the 1789 tax list in Greensville County, Virginia. I don’t know who either William Evans are just yet. Could be of interest.

 

John Goodwyn

John Goodwyn 1789 Personal Tax List A
John Goodwyn, the bondsman, on the 1789 tax list in Greensville County, Virginia.
Esau and Armistead Goodwyn 1789 Tax List B
Esau Goodwyn and Armistead Goodwyn, possibly related to the bondsman John Goodwyn. Tax List 1789 Greensville County, Virginia.

 

J. Parks

J Parks 1789 Personal Tax list A
Could be one of these J Parks that was the witness.

 

William Andrews

William Andrews 1789 Tax List A
Possibly William Andrews, the Methodist minister in Greensville County, Virginia.
Genealogy

Evans Family of Northampton County New Lead

About a year ago we received our first mtDNA match, a descendant of Nancy Evans of Northampton County, North Carolina who married Elijah Gums Boon and moved to Missouri.  Since then we’ve also received a match who is a descendant of Martha Marston through her daughter Mildred “Millie” Lewis.

I’ve been looking for a way the families paths could have crossed and think it may have been in Virginia.  I’ll get back to this point later.

The first match, Nancy’s descendant, mentioned a letter from her maternal line ancestor, Nancy Morrison (married Samuel Mize) from 1910.  The letter states, “you want to know about Grand Mother [sic], her maiden name was Evans, her mother’s name was Sarah Hayes.  Grand Mother was born in 1795, her father was a soldier in the Revolutionary war…”

Nancy Morrison Mize letter 1910
Excerpt from Nancy (Morrison) Mize’s letter about her grandmother Nancy Evans. She states Nancy was born in 1795, and that her mother was a woman named Sarah Hayes. The identity of Sarah Hayes’ husband is not revealed, although we know he is an Evans. This letter was found at Ancestry.com, on cousin match (moderate) and user RossEddy1’s family tree. I am not the owner of this letter.

Credit to RossEddy1 for the family letter on Ancestry.

Since I didn’t find mention of Henry Evans prior to 1810 in Northampton County, North Carolina so I spoke with a local professional genealogist at the McClelland Irish Library.  She told me to keep an open mind and also search Virginia records since Northampton was on the highly porous border.  She also told me to search for marriage records for Sarah Hayes, which I finally did today.

Greensville County Marriages page 25
From microfilm of the book “Register of Marriages, Greensville County, Virginia1781-1853” page 25 near the bottom, “Evans Henry and Salley Hayes 21 Sep 1790”

From microfilm of the book “Register of Marriages, Greensville County, Virginia1781-1853” page 25 near the bottom, “Evans Henry and Salley Hayes 21 Sep 1790; b- John Goodwyn wit- J Parks min-William Andrews (Methodist) 30Sep1790

Page 25 also mentions a couple from Northampton County getting married in Greensville County, so there’s that.

Now, this part is just speculation, but I couldn’t help notice Greensville County isn’t terribly far from Isle of Wight County.  According to online trees (I know, I know), Darling Drewry/Drury’s mother Mildred Lewis was born in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

Virginia Counties
Greensville County (top) Isle of Wight County
Genealogy

Sarah Evans Full Mitochondrial Sequence Match Updated

We finally received a mitochondrial DNA match on October 20th.  This person’s HVR1 and HVR2 results rolled in first, then the next day I was notified that it was a full sequence match!  Here’s a good explanation from Roberta Estes of DNA Explained on why this kind of match is significant: “Locations are extremely important when tracking mitochondrial DNA because if you match someone who is in the same area as your ancestor, then you’re close to finding your common ancestor. The records that may well prove the connection may be located in that geography as well. Some people are lucky enough to connect to a surname. Since they change every generation, the surname will likely be buried in the information of the other individual. You should ask them for their info as well, along with the areas where their ancestor lived. Don’t neglect sisters and who they married. Your ancestor’s sister may hold the key to your ancestry as well. I generally take my matches’ ancestor’s names and compare them to names in my Gedcom file to see what I find. It’s amazing how often I find something close geographically or sometimes I find their ancestor already listed as a sibling or niece or cousin of one of my ancestors. That’s powerful information.”

fms-v7-match-documentation
Our first mitochondrial DNA match. As you all know, I have been stuck on my furthest maternal line ancestor, Sarah Evans for a while. I know Sarah Evans was married to William Brummet in Chariton County, Missouri in 1827 and that the 1850 census for Livingston County, Missouri says she was from North Carolina. I even received a notification as the project administrator for Mothers of Missouri. This was super exciting: They are descendants of Nancy Evans who married Elijah Boon in Northampton County, North Carolina in 1814 before setting off for Missouri. Nancy Evans was born in October 1796 so there would have been about a 13-year gap between her and Sarah Evans. Nancy Evans’ parents were Henry Evans and Sarah Hayes. The match does not know Sarah Hayes’ mother.

UPDATE at the bottom, full match confirmed!  Nancy Boon/Nancy Evans and Sarah Brummett/Sarah Evans were sisters!

A cursory Google search for Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans, Missouri turns up this link, a short biography about Mrs. Harriet Bills (Harriet Boone) from the book, The History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri, 1886  mentions her parents “being Elijah and Nancy Boone, nee Evans. They were also both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in Northampton county, December 12, 1796, and by occupation was a farmer. He continued to live in the State of his birth until removing to Livingston county, Mo., in 1834. The mother was born October 12, 1796.”  A few pages before, it mentions William Wm. Brummett and Elijah Boon both living in Township 59, Ranges 24 and 25, respectively.  Our Sarah Evans and her husband William Brummett eventually end up in Livingston County.  This is where their daughter Mary Ann marries James Taylor.

This excerpt from the book History of Chariton and Howard Counties, Missouri page 459 notes Elijah Boone was one of the “old settlers” of Chariton County along with a Brummett.  This would put Elijah and Nancy Boon (Evans), and the Brummett Family in Chariton County prior to 1830.  Remember, Sarah Evans and William Brummett married in 1827 in Chariton County, Missouri.

brummett-and-boon-1830-chariton-co-mo
William Brummett, husband of Sarah Evans and Elijah Boon, husband of Nancy Evans in Chariton County, Missouri 1830.  FamilySearch

UPDATE!

Family Tree DNA’s help desk got back to me Monday, October 24 via Facebook to confirm that this is a full mitochondrial sequence match!  Sarah Evans and Nancy Evans are sisters!  When our display glitch is fixed I will add the mtDNA match picture here.  My mother also matches an AncestryDNA kit administered by user RossEddy1, both are descendants of Elijah Gumbs Boon and Nancy Evans.

ftdna-match-display-glitch
Full mitochondrial sequence match between Nancy Boon (Nancy Evans) and Sarah Brummett (Sarah Evans) confirmed!
fms-match-and-genealogical-info-evans
Family Tree DNA fixed it quickly.  This is the genealogical information sent to me by our match, this is the image I will use in our Ancestry.com family tree.