Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

C Romero Sauceda AncestryDNA
CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

CSDNA Ancestry Profile
CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.
Genealogy

Marriage Bond Between Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans, Northampton County NC

There wasn’t any extra information, why does this always happen to me?  It reads:

“We, the undersigned, do hereby acknowledge ourselves indebted to his Excellency, Wm Hawkins Esquire, Governer, &c. and his successors office, in the sum of five hundred pounds. But to be void on condition that there is no lawful cause obstruct a marriage between Elijah Gumbs and Nancy Evans for whom a liceace [?] no issues.

Witness, our hands and seals, this 17th day of Feb A.D. 1814

In presence of Tom Hughes                                             Henry -x- Evans his mark”

 

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Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans 17 FEB 1814 Northampton County, North Carolina.  Bondsman Henry Evans.  Tom Hughes was a clerk who appears in many marriage records around this time in Northampton County.

 

Genealogy

Bondsman Henry Evans

In my last post, I told you about FamilySearch’s microfiche containing a record of Nancy Evans’ marriage to Elijah Gumbs Boon.  In it, two individuals were listed who I thought might help me in my search for the parents of Nancy Evans: witness Tom Hughes and bondsman Henry Evans.

Several online trees list William Evans and Sarah Hayes as the parents of Nancy Evans, but I have not found a conclusive link yet. One of the online genealogies I started with was another WordPress blog called Native American Roots that mentions William Evans and Sarah Hayes, and that William was the son of Major Evans (1733-1814), son of Charles Evans (1696-1760), son of Morris Evans the elder (1665-1739). A helpful person in the Evans DNA Project at Family Tree DNA pointed me to Deloris William’s well-known Evans of North Carolina genealogy page, which has an extensive section concerning Morris the elder.

However, I couldn’t reconcile this family being from the Orange/Granville/Wake counties area while William and Sarah were living in Northampton County.

northampton-and-wake-counties-nc-1811
Northampton County NC 1741 (Nancy Evans marries Elijah Gumbs Boon 1814) Granville County NC established 1746 Orange County NC established 1752 Wake County NC established 1771

There just doesn’t seem to be an obvious connection. So I searched for Henry Evans on Deloris’ page to see if maybe he was the connection other Nancy Evans/Elijah Gumbs Boon researchers were finding.  I did find a Henry Evans:

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Deloris Williams Evans of North Carolina genealogy page- Henry Evans 1810, Wake County North Carolina

I went to FamilySearch to find this Henry Evans on the 1810 census in Wake County only to find the 1810 and 1820 census for Wake County were lost.  I found another Henry Evans on the 1810 census for Northampton County, though, who I believe is most likely the Henry Evans bondsman on Nancy and Elijah Gumbs Boon’s marriage record and a different person than the Henry Evans in Wake County NC in 1810.

henry-evans-1810-northampton-nc-census

Genealogy

Nancy Evans and Elijah Gumbs Boon of What County, North Carolina?

In my last post, I described our recent mitochondrial DNA breakthrough and described some of the information I’ve found online, including the book History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri 1886 in which Harriet (Boon) Bills speaks of her parents, Nancy Evans and Elijah Gumbs Boon of Northampton County, NC.  There is no mention of Nancy’s or Elijah’s parents.

I ordered Nancy and Elijah’s record of marriage on October 29 hoping it might shed some light on their parents, but while I’m waiting, I’ve looked around online. Many online genealogies conclude that Nancy’s parents were William Evans and Sarah Hayes of Wake County, North Carolina although I haven’t seen the exact evidence that ties them all together.  I feel like I can’t establish that Nancy and Elijah are in Northampton County until I see the microfilm myself.  The book I mentioned earlier says that Elijah Gumbs Boon was born in Northampton County.  Nancy’s parents were supposed to be from Wake County, North Carolina.  I’m not putting them together just yet.  Is there some sort of land record I don’t know about?  A sale of land in Wake County? A purchase of land in Northampton County?  Are they close to each other? What are the histories of these two counties?

A quick Wikipedia search says Northampton County, NC was formed in 1741 from Bertie County, so it was definitely a county when Elijah Gumbs Boon was born in 1796 and when he married Nancy Evans in 1814.  Wikipedia also says Wake County was formed later, in 1771 from Cumberland, Johnston, and Orange Counties.  I don’t have any evidence yet that the majority of these researchers are wrong, but something doesn’t feel right.  It seems like a large jump from Wake County where William Evans died in 1823 and Northampton County where his alleged daughter married Elijah Gumbs Boon in 1814.  Plus, I’ve only seen the children of William Evans and Sarah Hayes of Wake County NC as 3 sons, Henderson, Daniel, and Enoch.

The counties also don’t border each other as you can see at this website, which corroborates the Wikipedia entries for the most part.  Yes, I could be wrong but something doesn’t add up for me yet.  I hope the microfilm from Family Search comes soon and can help me figure this out.

wake-and-northampton-counties-nc

 

 

Genealogy, Uncategorized

Sarah Evans Full Mitochondrial Sequence Match Updated

We finally received a mitochondrial DNA match on October 20th.  This person’s HVR1 and HVR2 results rolled in first, then the next day I was notified that it was a full sequence match!  Here’s a good explanation from Roberta Estes of DNA Explained on why this kind of match is significant: “Locations are extremely important when tracking mitochondrial DNA because if you match someone who is in the same area as your ancestor, then you’re close to finding your common ancestor. The records that may well prove the connection may be located in that geography as well. Some people are lucky enough to connect to a surname. Since they change every generation, the surname will likely be buried in the information of the other individual. You should ask them for their info as well, along with the areas where their ancestor lived. Don’t neglect sisters and who they married. Your ancestor’s sister may hold the key to your ancestry as well. I generally take my matches’ ancestor’s names and compare them to names in my Gedcom file to see what I find. It’s amazing how often I find something close geographically or sometimes I find their ancestor already listed as a sibling or niece or cousin of one of my ancestors. That’s powerful information.”

fms-v7-match-documentation
Our first mitochondrial DNA match. As you all know, I have been stuck on my furthest maternal line ancestor, Sarah Evans for a while. I know Sarah Evans was married to William Brummet in Chariton County, Missouri in 1827 and that the 1850 census for Livingston County, Missouri says she was from North Carolina. I even received a notification as the project administrator for Mothers of Missouri. This was super exciting: They are descendants of Nancy Evans who married Elijah Boon in Northampton County, North Carolina in 1814 before setting off for Missouri. Nancy Evans was born in October 1796 so there would have been about a 13-year gap between her and Sarah Evans. Nancy Evans’ parents were William Evans (sometimes William Evins) and Sarah Hayes. The match does not know Sarah Hayes’ mother.

UPDATE at the bottom, full match confirmed!  Nancy Boon/Nancy Evans and Sarah Brummett/Sarah Evans were sisters!

A cursory Google search for Elijah Boon and Nancy Evans, Missouri turns up this link, a short biography about Mrs. Harriet Bills (Harriet Boone) from the book, The History of Caldwell and Livingston Counties, Missouri, 1886  mentions her parents “being Elijah and Nancy Boone, nee Evans. They were also both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in Northampton county, December 12, 1796, and by occupation was a farmer. He continued to live in the State of his birth until removing to Livingston county, Mo., in 1834. The mother was born October 12, 1796.”  A few pages before, it mentions William Wm. Brummett and Elijah Boon both living in Township 59, Ranges 24 and 25, respectively.  Our Sarah Evans and her husband William Brummett eventually end up in Livingston County.  This is where their daughter Mary Ann marries James Taylor.

This excerpt from the book History of Chariton and Howard Counties, Missouri page 459 notes Elijah Boone was one of the “old settlers” of Chariton County along with a Brummett.  This would put Elijah and Nancy Boon (Evans), and the Brummett Family in Chariton County prior to 1830.  Remember, Sarah Evans and William Brummett married in 1827 in Chariton County, Missouri.

brummett-and-boon-1830-chariton-co-mo
William Brummett, husband of Sarah Evans and Elijah Boon, husband of Nancy Evans in Chariton County, Missouri 1830.  FamilySearch

UPDATE!

Family Tree DNA’s help desk got back to me Monday, October 24 via Facebook to confirm that this is a full mitochondrial sequence match!  Sarah Evans and Nancy Evans are sisters!  When our display glitch is fixed I will add the mtDNA match picture here.  My mother also matches an AncestryDNA kit administered by user RossEddy1, both are descendants of Elijah Gumbs Boon and Nancy Evans.

ftdna-match-display-glitch
Full mitochondrial sequence match between Nancy Boon (Nancy Evans) and Sarah Brummett (Sarah Evans) confirmed!
fms-match-and-genealogical-info-evans
Family Tree DNA fixed it quickly.  This is the genealogical information sent to me by our match, this is the image I will use in our Ancestry.com family tree.
Genealogy, Uncategorized

Thomas Benton Brummett

Or however his last name is spelled.  I copied and pasted this paragraph from a post I made elsewhere.  Thanks to Ancestry.com users momworldorder and margos1776 for sharing their lovely family photos.

This is Beatrice Ortega. Her maternal grandmother was Mary Ann Brummett of Livingston County, Missouri. The gentleman is Thomas Benton Brummett, one of the few Brummetts I have seen a picture of so far. I’m sure I’m researching the correct family because of their similarities! Thomas Benton Brummett was Beatrice Ortega’s maternal grand-uncle. It was because Thomas named one of his daughters Sarah Evans Brummett in honor of his mother that I was able to confirm Sarah Evans as my 5th great grandmother. He’s one of those ancestors who stands out; I think he wanted us to know of him and his family and I’m very grateful for it.

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Celebrations, Genealogy

Dia de los Muertos

Happy Autumn celebrations to you and your loved ones!

Our 2015 Dia de los Muertos altar.  Our son decorated the sugar skull.
Our 2015 Dia de los Muertos altar. Our son decorated the sugar skull.

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