Genealogy, Movies, Music

Finally Processing

My maternal uncle’s DNA kit is being processed after a six-week wait.CS_DNA

This small update is a great excuse to share this song from Moana, which I have recently seen for the first time this past weekend.  It was so good!  Definitely one of my favorite ancestor movies right along with The Book of Life and Kubo and the Two Strings.  Disney and Pixar have another Dia de los Muertos movie, Coco, that is scheduled for release November 2017.

I loved this song, “I am Moana (Song of the Ancestors)”.

Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

C Romero Sauceda AncestryDNA
CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

CSDNA Ancestry Profile
CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.
Genealogy, Immigration

Bernardo Sauceda or Sanseda or Salsado, Senior

I’ve been frustrated with being unable to get further on Bernardo Sauceda Sr. since seeing the record of his marriage to Francisca Garza in Zapata County, Texas, 1900. One of my maternal uncle’s Y-DNA37 matches (distance 4, 69.98% chance they share a common ancestor within 8 generations) is a Mr. SANCEDO, so I went to FamilySearch and searched “Bernardo Sancedo” because, well, why the hell not?

The death certificate for a boy named Dolores Sauseda came up, improperly transcribed as Sancedo (luck!). Parents were Bernardo Sauceda (properly spelled) and Francisca Garzo. 

Dolores Sauceda death cert
Dolores Sauceda death certificate, May 17, 1927, in Burleson County, Texas. Parents Bernardo Sauceda and Francisca Garza.

 

I entered these criteria and found a death certificate for Bernardo Sauceda under the name Bernardo Sanseda who was born in 1864 in Mexico and died in the same Texas county as the boy Dolores on July 5, 1935. His wife is listed as Francisca Sanseda.

 

Bernardo Sanseda death cert
Bernardo Sauceda Sr. death certificate July 5, 1935, in Burleson County, Texas. He was born in Mexico around 1864.

 

Since the son Dolores died in 1927 and Bernardo Sauceda Sr. died in 1935, both in Burleson County, Texas, I searched the 1930 census page by page for them.

The family was there under the name Salsado, and many of their first names were written incorrectly as well so it was no wonder we couldn’t find them on previous census records.

The names should be Bernardo Sauceda, Francsica (Garza), Felipe, Jose, Cruz, Rosa, Bernardo, Ysidro, and Paul (Paulino maybe).

 

Bernardo Sauceda family 1930 census info
Bernardo Sauceda Sr. and family on the 1930 census. Appears as “Benard Salsado”.

 

Now we know Bernardo Sauceda Sr. was born about 1864 in Mexico and died July 5, 1935, in Burleson County, Texas.  The census says both he and Francisca immigrated to the United States in 1900, though I have not seen immigration records for them thus far.  The Texas immigration records start in 1903 or something like that on FamilySearch.  They were married in Zapata County, Texas February 2, 1900, so I’m not sure if the arrival year is correct for either of them.

Genealogy

Mom’s Autosomal DNA

MomAC

Two things surprised me about her autosomal results: her 10% nonspecific Northern European (in addition to 3.7% British & Irish and .9% French & German), and her low amount of Middle Eastern and North African.  It makes me think my Family Tree DNA results are off.

V7I wrote about my mom’s mitochondrial haplogroup here.

Genealogy

Sauceda Paternal Haplogroup/ Y-DNA

My mom’s father’s surname was Sauceda and I was able to get one of my uncles to submit a sample for paternal line testing (only to the 37th marker, I don’t know if we’ll upgrade).  This is what we found:

Sauceda Y DNA

His haplogroup is E projected subclade is E-M35.1 if we tested more markers.  You can click my Haplogroup E-M35.1 tag if you would like to see my older posts on this subclade since it is also my husband’s subclade (Though I think this would change if we tested more markers.  His birthday is coming up, so we’ll see.). We don’t actually know anything about grandpa’s father partially because we couldn’t actually find his birth certificate.  But we do know that grandpa’s mother was born in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.  Grandpa and his brothers were born in Tyler, Texas so his father either met his mother in Texas or Tamaulipas I think.

Anyway, I submitted my uncle’s sample for inclusion in the Mexico DNA Project and humbly ask you to check it out and join.  Please.  Especially if you suspect any of your lines are Native American because the database needs more samples!  This is the description:

“The Genealogy of Mexico DNA Project was started on 9/7/03 and is for those whose Y-dna (father’s father’s father’s…) or Mitochondrial DNA (mother’s mother’s mother’s …) line extends to Mexico or New Spain. This includes the following states prior to 1848; California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Nevada, Utah and Colorado.

I have always wondered about the origins of my ancestors in Mexico. In 1998 I started The Genealogy of Mexico website with this in mind. It has always been my hope that information shared would lead us to the genealogical answers we seek.
With new advances in science it is possible to determine our ancient origins and see who we are related to.

PLEASE NOTE: the following names are names we are researching and may not necessarily be in the project. This research can be found on THIS website. This study concerns all the surnames of Mexico.”

Interestingly, my uncle has a match (although not a perfect match which indicates a few generations have passed since we shared a common ancestor) whose last name is Sancedo.  Mr. Sancedo mentioned to me that his father told him the surname had been Saucedo a long time ago but was changed at some point.  He doesn’t know why.

Genealogy

The Garza Sauceda Men

Here is a picture of my grandfather Bernardo Garza Sauceda’s brothers.  They were from Tyler, Smith County, Texas.

Paulino Garza Sauceda in the baseball uniform, with brother Cruz Garza Sauceda.
Grandpa Berdardo Garza Sauceda
This is Paul’s obituary which does not mention time in the armed services, but the man in the first picture looks like this to me.
Not sure who these people are, but it’s the same side of the family.

I think there’s quite the resemblance between my grandfather’s brother Paulino Garza Sauceda and my mom.  Inheritance is fascinating.
For fun, my mom's Sauceda/Saucedo autosomal matches
For fun, my mom’s Sauceda/Saucedo autosomal matches
My uncle's Y-DNA match at 37 markers.  We think Sancedo may have been an alternate spelling.
My uncle’s Y-DNA match at 37 markers. We think Sancedo may have been an alternate spelling.
A few of my mom's autosomal Garza family matches.
A few of my mom’s autosomal Garza family matches.
A few of my mom's autosomal Cantu family matches.
A few of my mom’s autosomal Cantu family matches.