Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
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Genealogy, Movies, Music

Finally Processing

My maternal uncle’s DNA kit is being processed after a six-week wait.CS_DNA

This small update is a great excuse to share this song from Moana, which I have recently seen for the first time this past weekend.  It was so good!  Definitely one of my favorite ancestor movies right along with The Book of Life and Kubo and the Two Strings.  Disney and Pixar have another Dia de los Muertos movie, Coco, that is scheduled for release November 2017.

I loved this song, “I am Moana (Song of the Ancestors)”.

Genealogy

Missouri First Families

My Missouri First Families certificate for Sarah Evans and William Brummet from the Missouri State Genealogical Association came in today!  As I’ve mentioned before, Sarah Evans had a sister, Nancy Evans, who married Elijah Gumbs Boon.  Their descendants would be eligible for the same certificate if any cousins are interested in pursuing it.  Also, obligatory link to the Mothers of Missouri DNA Project (MoM).

Genealogy

Mom’s Shared Ancestor Hints and NADs

Because I should probably write something every once in a while.

She has 11 Shared Ancestor Hints:

  • Two share Candelario Garza Martinez and Felicitas Cantú
    • Candelario Garza Martinez born about 1834 in Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico to Froilan de la Garza and Rita Martinez
    • We don’t know when or where Felicitas Cantú was born, but the couple ended up in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico as seen on my ancestor Francisca Garza’s baptism record.
    • One match is a known cousin, the other through the couple’s daughter, Candelaria Garza.
  • Three share Maria Guadalupe Martín, and only Maria Guadalupe Martín because each is listed with a different husband and children.
Manuel Urioste.jpg
In our tree: This is from the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 published by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.  It shows Manuel Urioste’s wife Maria Guadalupe Martín has died so he goes on to marry Maria Felipe Montoya.  Manuel Urioste and Maria Guadalupe Martín’s sons Feliz Urioste and Aniceto Urioste were the witnesses.

New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 a publication by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.

st-francis-cathedral-santa-fe
My son and I in front of St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2016
  • FINALLY one descendant of William Brummet and Sarah Evans through their daughter Susan Frances Brummitt.
    • Susan Frances Brummitt was born 1836 in Grundy County, Missouri and married John William Karr in 1857.
  • Two share Juan Ygnacio Armijo and Maria Eulalia Sandoval
    • We don’t know where Juan Ygnacio Armijo or Maria Eulalia Sandoval were born, but their son (our ancestor) Ruperto Armijo was born in 1826 in Pena Blanca, Sandoval County, New Mexico.
    • One match is through their son Antonio Armijo born about 1834, the other is through their daughter Maria Estefanita Armijo born about 1822.
  • The last three have private trees so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mom is up to three New Ancestor Discoveries who I thought maybe could bee in-laws but so far I haven’t been able to place them.

  • Richard Scott and Rebecca Ann Cooper
    • Richard Scott was born in 1807 in Virginia.
    • He married Rebecca Ann Cooper in Virginia 1838.
  • James Harris born about 1811 in Bedford County, Virginia [ Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 on Ancestry]

mom-nads

Genealogy

Word to your mother (and her mother, and her mother)

If you are into genealogy and thinking about genetic testing, please consider taking a mitochondrial DNA test.  It’s overlooked by genealogists as a tool to trace their maternal ancestry.  It is also a great way to help others!  I Someone might be desperately researching their maternal line and need a hand.  The regular price for the mtDNA Plus kit is $69.  I am considering buying one for someone who can show me they are also descended from Sarah Evans (married to William Brummet) through a direct female line.  

This awesome new blog by a Family Tree DNA employee tells it well:

“Also technically speaking, mtDNA is the black sheep of genetic genealogy. It’s sort of like that friend you had when you were a kid that you didn’t really like but kept around because their parents had a lot of money. mtDNA is important, but not necessarily fun.

Now here’s the part where I advocate for mtDNA testing after such a supportive prologue. In all honesty, it’s sometimes necessary. Do you want to confirm your deep, direct maternal line Native American ancestry? Autosomal DNA can’t help, as it only deals with recent ancestry (we’ll get into autosomal testing soon). mtDNA testing is the only test that can possibly help in this quest if, say, your mother’s mother’s mother’s mother was Native American and inherited that from her mother. Do you want to confirm a relationship with another individual with whom you share direct maternal ancestry, and the other individual doesn’t have autosomal DNA results? mtDNA is the way to go. Would you like a rough idea of likely recent maternal countries of origin? mtDNA is your test! Are you a masochist that thrives off of pain, sweat, and sleeplessness derived from genealogical brick walls and want a test as anger fuel? mtDNA is the only way to go.” Jeremy Balkin, Breaking Genetics

Also, if you are a customer with 23andMe, please respond to messages!  Even if you don’t know what the person is talking about, just tell the inquirer so.

I actually sent a message to the last V7 match two years ago, I just also sent him a more recent message 6 months ago. None of these matches have responded.
I actually sent a message to the last V7 match two years ago, I just also sent him a more recent message 6 months ago. None of these matches have responded.
Uncategorized

To those whose DNA matches mine, mom’s, and grandma’s

Congratulations, those are some strong genes!  But seriously, I was going through my maternal matches and saw that only a few who match all 3 of us shared any genealogical information in their profiles.  These are them, their most distant ancestors if listed, and their surnames, if shared:

E. H. Vannoy, S. Vannoy, and M. Vannoy
Most Distant Ancestors
Paternal: Elijah Vannoy b c1784 Wilkes NC d c1850 Hancock TN
Maternal: Mary Ann Ford, b 1835 Pulaski KY, d 1925 Pettis MO

[VA→TN], Sims [VA], Talbot [-], Thornton, Thorton [VA], Truel [France→VA→KY→MO], Tryntye, Tussey [DE→NC→TN], Ukn., Unk., Upton [England→MO], Valentine [KY], Van Noy [NC→TN→MO], Vannoy [NC→TN→MO], Vanoy [NC→TN→MO], Walker [NC→TN], Ward [-], Wash [-], Waters [VA], Webb [KY→TN], Whitcher [-], Wisdom [VA→MS], Wolf, Wolfhardt [Germany→PA], Woodruf [-], Zimmerman [Germany]

R. C. Douglas
Most Distant Ancestors
Paternal: John Douglass b.30/12/1731, St Pauls London Eng.
Maternal: Mary (surname unknown)

Champion [Cornwall], Dixon [West Bromwich England], Douglas [London], Douglas [Cambridgeshire], Douglas [Western Australia], Douglas [Glasgow], Douglas [New Zealand], Douglass [Cambridgeshire], Duglas [Covent Gardens London]

J. Springer

Springer [Pennsylvania]

V. G. Moore
Most Distant Ancestors
Paternal: John Jackson Moore, 1754 – 1842
Maternal: Susan Jane Lite, 1839 – 1906

F. D. Akin
Most Distant Ancestors
Paternal: Brantly Duncan b.1821 SC d.1864, GA
Maternal: Nancy E Cain b.1802 GA, d.1885 GA

Cain [GA], Dobbins [GA], Duncan [GA/SC], Head [GA], Robinson [Carroll-GA], Smith [Carroll-GA], Stewart [GA], Warren [GA]

J. Hagen
Most Distant Ancestors
Arnold Hagenbucher born in Switzerland. Came to US. Married Albertina Polier
Hagen [US], Hagenbucher [Switzerland, US], Moore [Ontario Canada, US], Polier [US]

I have no idea how to connect them, other than some matches one match had family in areas I know we had Taylor, Brummit, or Evans ancestors.  Either I am missing some branch of my family or they are.  Most likely both.