Genealogy

Romero Family of Santa Fe, New Mexico

Grandma Dolores didn’t speak much of her father, she said she didn’t remember him very well.  When I was a child I didn’t think much of it.  She did always claim her middle name was Salomé though, but no one on her mother Domitila Gonzales’ side of the family had that name.

After she passed I took another look at her birth certificate and saw she didn’t have a middle name, though she did use the middle initial “S” on some of her important documents, such as on the affidavit for her marriage license.  She insisted that it stood for Salomé.

Eloy Martinez Dolores S. Romero Marriage
Marriage of Eloy Martinez and Dolores S. Romero January 1950 in Phoenix, Arizona. Eloy Martinez was grandma’s legal husband though not my grandfather.  The “S” here is exactly like the “S” for South in the street address listed above.

Her parents Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were married in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1924.  On the application for the marriage license, Manuel says his birthday is February 11, 1891.

Manuel Romero marriage part 1
The marriage of Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales June 1924 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Manuel Romero’s birthday is February 11, 1891.
Domitila divorce Manuel Romero
By April 1934 Manuel Romero and Domitila Gonzales were separated. My grandmother Dolores would have been around 7 years old.

In the book, New Mexico Baptisms, Santa Fe, NM, January 1884-December 1899 there is a record for Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892.  The day and the year are off, but the month is the same.  His parents were Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.  I believe this Manuel is my grandmother’s father.  I had seen them on the Santa Fe census in the past and wondered if they were Manuel’s family, but I didn’t have any clue about Manuel’s birthday back then.  The scanned page of the baptism book was provided to me by Denver Public Library.

Manuel Romero baptism
Manuel Romero born February 20, 1892 to Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya.

Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya were married November 27, 1886, at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe.  Their parents were Desiderio Romero and Guadalupe Lujan, and Baltazar Montoya and Eleanor Ribera.  On other documents, she is written as Leonor Ribera. From the book Santa Fe Marriages, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858-October 1889

Luciano Romero Salome Montoya marriage 1886
Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya married November 27, 1886, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

After Salomé died, Luciano married Ursula Rodriguez.

Luciano Romero Ursula Rodriguez marriage 1900
Luciano Romero, widowed of Salomé Montoya, married Ursula Rodriguez in 1900.

On some census records, Manuel’s birthday is in May, but the names all match up so I’m sure this is the correct family.

Manuel Romero 1900 census
1900 Census in Santa Fe, here Manuel Romero’s birthday is in May of 1891. This might be why he believed he was born in 1891. He is listed with his siblings, stepmother Ursula Rodriguez, father Luciano Romero and his paternal grandfather Desiderio Romero lives nearby.

Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya and Juana Gonzales. From the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Parish and Military Chapel of Our Lady of Light (La Castrense) 1728-1857

Baltazar Montoya and Maria Leonor Ribera 1850
Salomé Montoya’s parents Baltazar Montoya and and Maria Leonor Ribera were married December 11, 1850 in Santa Fe. Their parents were Juan José Montoya & Juana Gonzales, and Francisco Ribera & Marcelina Quintana.
Genealogy, Movies, Music

Finally Processing

My maternal uncle’s DNA kit is being processed after a six-week wait.CS_DNA

This small update is a great excuse to share this song from Moana, which I have recently seen for the first time this past weekend.  It was so good!  Definitely one of my favorite ancestor movies right along with The Book of Life and Kubo and the Two Strings.  Disney and Pixar have another Dia de los Muertos movie, Coco, that is scheduled for release November 2017.

I loved this song, “I am Moana (Song of the Ancestors)”.

Genealogy

Who was Federico Partida? Another Marriage Mystery, San Benito, Texas

Ancestry now has a record of my paternal grandparents’ marriage in Yuma, Pinal County, 1958.  I was surprised by this because I always assumed they met and married in Texas and because my grandmother was 16 years old (!) when she married my mysterious grandfather.  Remember, he shed his name when he came to the United States and Amelia lent him a name from her family tree.  I wonder why they went all the way to Yuma to get married?  They lived in Mesa at the time.

az-yuma-marriage-record-amelia-juarez
My paternal grandparents’ marriage certificate from 1958, Yuma, Pinal County, Arizona. Amelia Juarez Rangel was born in San Benito, Cameron County, Texas in 1941 to Maria Teresa Rangel and Benito Juarez.

One of the witnesses was Maria Rangel, I think that was her mother who appears on the 1940 census in Cameron County, Texas, right outside of San Benito.  The other witness was someone named Federico Partida who I was able to find on the same 1940 census of Cameron County, Texas, right outside of San Benito.  Interesting.

miguel-juarez-household
Miguel Juarez with wife Juana Conde and children Gertrudes, Luz, Benito, Maria (Rangel, daughter in law), Anna, Chavo Rozendez (son in law), grandsons Eduardo and Narcisso, Juan Conde (nephew) and Irma Conde (niece). 1940 Census of Cameron County, Texas right outside of San Benito.
mauricia-partida-household-1940-cam-co-tx
Federico Partida in the household of Mauricia Partida with Nasario, Pablo, and Tomas Partida. 1940 Census of Cameron County, Texas, right outside of San Benito.
Genealogy

A Quaker in the War of 1812?

UPDATE: It was probably a son named Henry.

I’m writing this mostly to make sense of it, sorry if it jumps around a lot.  I met with a genealogist recently at my local Family History Library and she gave me some really good suggestions about researching Henry Evans.

As you already know, I found him on the 1810 census in Northampton County, NC.

On this record, he was between the ages of 26 and 44, which would mean he was probably born between the years 1766 and 1784.  He had a wife, 2 boys, and 3 girls at the time.  If this is the right Henry, Nancy was probably the girl between 10-15 years old which would make sense if she married Elijah Gumbs Boon in 1815.  My Sarah may have been one of the girls under 10 as we think she was born around 1809.

henry-evans-1810-census
Henry Evans on the 1810 Census, 7 people in the household, total: Henry Evans, his wife, 2 boys, and 3 girls.

Anyway, based on the timeframe, the genealogist mentioned I should check the records for the War of 1812.  I found a pay voucher for Henry Evans of the Northampton Militia at digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll7/id/3863 and also mention of him in the muster rolls from the book Muster Rolls of the Soldiers of the War of 1812: detached from the militia of North Carolina, in 1812 and 1814 Henry Evans page 20 #79 https://archive.org/details/musterrollsofsol00nort .  I did not find a pension record for him.

henry-evans-war-of-1812-pay-voucher
Henry Evans pay voucher for service in the War of 1812. NC ECHO.

I searched Ancestry with this new information and saw a Henry Evans in the Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935.  Of course, I got way too excited for someone who knows better.  Would a Quaker have participated in the War of 1812?  I didn’t think so. So I was surprised when I Googled “Henry Evans Northampton County NC Quakers” and the first document to come up included the line,

“In First Month, 1886, there is a recorded minute to the effect that William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliott, and Henry Evans were not disowned for volunteering their services in the army.”

Wow!  A couple of prior paragraphs talk about the War of 1812 so I felt like the genealogy angels were my tech support at the moment.  Though, when I read the year 1886 I was a little bummed because if he was born even at the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he would have been 102 years old, and therefore, probably not the guy I was looking for.  I checked the Ancestry records and found the record mentioned in the pdf for the year 1866, not 1886.  If he were born at the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he’d be about 82 which is more probable than 102.

henry-evans-1866-quaker-meeting-notes
Quaker Meeting Records 1866, Rich Square Meeting in which William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliot, and Henry Evans get to retain their membership.

One of the Quaker Meeting Notes from 1843 lists his wife as Mary, and “six of their children, namely James, Sarah J[?], Martha A, Celia E, Christian, and Henry”.  I might be reading too much into “six of their children” but at this time Sarah and Nancy would have been in Missouri.  If he were born in the latter end of the 1766-1784 spectrum he’d have been about 59 years old.  He can be 59 and still have 6 kids, right?  Especially if he remarried?

henry-evans-family-1843-meeting
Quaker Meeting Notes from 1843, Northampton County, lists Henry Evans’ wife as Mary, and “six of their children, namely James, Sarah J[?], Martha A, Celia E, Christian, and Henry”.
Henry Evans with his wife Mary and 3 of his children: James, 21 (born about 1829), Martha, 16 (born about 1834), and Celia, 14 (born about 1836) are on the 1850 census in Northampton County, NC.  These children were born well after the Henry Evans family on the 1810 census.  Still, it is possible that this could be the same Henry but with a different wife.  I assume a different wife because she was between ages 26-44 years old on the 1810 census, so if she was the youngest possible, 26, she would have been born around 1784 making her about 52 when the youngest child, Celia, was born in 1836.  Celia would have been born about 9 years after my Sarah Evans married William Brummet.

According to the 1850 census, he was about 62 years old, born in 1788.  That would have made him 22 on the 1810 census, where he is clearly marked as being between the ages of 26-44 years old.  The general rule is to stick with the information from the earliest census, so it is possible he was the youngest age available, 26, at the time making the age given in the 1850 census younger by 4 years.  Not impossible.  Also, we have Nancy Evans born around 1796.  If we add back the 4 years taken from the 1850 census, Henry Evans would have been born around 1784, making him 29 during his service in the War of 1812, 12 years old when Nancy was born (Although I find this date suspicious because her husband Elijah was born 12 Dec 1796 and Nancy is said to have been born 12 Oct 1796, what are the chances they were both born on the 12th day of the month, same year?), and 26 on the 1810 census.  There was a female 10-15 years of age on the 1810 census, if it were Nancy she would have been born 1795-1800, so I guess year-wise that is close to what we know about her.  The 1810 census pretty much says if Henry Evans had a child born around 1800, he could have been anywhere between 16 to 34 years of age (He could have been born 1766-1784 according to his age bracket).

henry-evans-1850-census
Henry Evans 1850 census Northampton County with wife Mary, and three of their children: James, Martha, and Celia.

So how can I tell if the 1810 Census Henry Evans is also the 1850 census Henry Evans?  I went back to the 1866 record of the three men who were allowed to retain their Friends (Quaker) membership despite their participation in the War of 1812.  The three men named were William Copeland, Thomas B. Elliot, and Henry Evans.  Were they in the census for Northampton County back in 1810?  That would make it more likely that they were friends in addition to being Friends (punny!).  I found William Copeland on page 7 of 44, but no Thomas.  There was an Elliot household, though, run by Sarah Elliot.

william-copeland-1810-census
William Copeland on the 1810 census of Northampton County, NC. William Copeland was one of the three men, along with Henry Evans, mentioned in the 1866 Quaker Meeting Records for being allowed to retain their membership despite their participation in the War of 1812.

Another name from the first Quaker record in which I found Henry Evans, in 1843, mentions a Josiah Outland.  Truthfully, the name Outland stood out to me because of the Outlander book series.  And Josiah isn’t a common name anymore so I went to see if I could find him on the 1810 census, he was there he is on page 29 of the Northampton census.

josiah-outland-1810-census
Josiah Outland on the 1810 census of Northampton County, NC. He was mentioned in the 1843 Quaker Meeting Records I found pertaining to Henry Evans. Josiah just sounds like a Quaker.

So, what do you think?  Is this the same Henry Evans?

Genealogy, Music

Music Mood Today: La Raíz de Mi Tierra

Spanish lyrics via Google Play/English lyrics translated by Google Translate because I suck at languages.  Mine, yours, theirs, all.

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

What will become of me, if you’re not there

I come as a dream, I always believed

If I do not have here, close to me

Surround for me and I can continue

 

I want to be there

If the island sleeps

I want to see the waves

When the sea wakes

And take your air

In my blood

 

To give me time

In the pace and depth

A thirsty voice

Full of emotion

 

I bring tonight

The root of my land

I bring verses

Three people who dream

I give you the aroma and taste of my land

 

I give you time in the rhythm and depth

A voice filled with emotion thirsting

I bring tonight

The root of my land

I bring verses

Three people who dream

I give you the aroma and taste of my land

I bring my root

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

Why you lost girl

If your home is here

Here are your people and life

Your navel [umbilical] root

 

Here are your people and life

Your navel [umbilical] root

 

I went hungry myself away

Hunger to seek truth

First I lost my way

Today I turn on track

First I lost my way

Today I turn on track

 

Now I can sing you to me that bore me

I no longer feel invisible

Now I can be who I am

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I am part of you

I’ll take blood

If once I went

It was to miss you

I always come back to you

I can not refuse

You’re my part hidden

I share your avante [no good translation]

 

When my time comes

I want to go back to your belly

I will be a new seed

Urgent full of dreams

I will be a new seed

Urgent full of dreams

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I am looking where I come

What did I miss

I am looking where I come

Here is my root

 

I bring tonight

The root of my land

I bring verses

Three people who dream

I give you the aroma and taste of my land

I bring my root

 

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Qué será de mí, si no estás ahí
Vengo como un sueño, que siempre creí
Si no te tengo aquí, cerquita de mí
Para que me arropes y pueda seguir

Quiero estar ahí
Si la isla duerme
Quiero ver las olas
Cuando el mar despierte
Y llevar tu aire
Dentro de mi sangre

Para darme tiempo
En el ritmo y hondura
Una voz sedienta
Llena de emoción

Yo te traigo esta noche
La raíz de mi tierra
Yo te traigo los versos
Tres personas que sueñan
Te regalo el aroma y el sabor de mi tierra

Te regalo tiempo en el ritmo y hondura
Una voz sedienta llena de emoción
Yo te traigo esta noche
La raíz de mi tierra
Yo te traigo los versos
Tres personas que sueñan
Te regalo el aroma y el sabor de mi tierra
Traigo mi raíz

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Por qué te perdiste niña
Si tu casa es por aquí
Aquí está tu raza y vida
De tu ombligo la raíz

Aquí está tu raza y vida
De tu ombligo la raíz

Con hambre me fui yo lejos
Hambre de buscar verdad
Primero perdí mi rumbo
Hoy me vuelvo a encaminar
Primero perdí mi rumbo
Hoy me vuelvo a encaminar

Ya le puedo cantar a la que a mí me parió
Ya no me siento invisible
Ya puedo ser quien soy yo

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Soy parte de ti
Te llevo en la sangre
Si una vez me fui
Fue para extrañarte
Siempre vuelvo a ti
No puedo negarte
Tu mi parte oculta
Yo tu parte avante

Cuando llegue mi tiempo
Quiero volver a tu vientre
Seré una nueva semilla
Llena de sueños urgentes
Seré una nueva semilla
Llena de sueños urgentes

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Busco de dónde vengo
Que me perdí
Busco de dónde vengo
Que aquí está mi raíz

Yo te traigo esta noche
La raíz de mi tierra
Yo te traigo los versos
Tres personas que sueñan
Te regalo el aroma y el sabor de mi tierra
Traigo mi raíz

Genealogy

Word to your mother (and her mother, and her mother)

If you are into genealogy and thinking about genetic testing, please consider taking a mitochondrial DNA test.  It’s overlooked by genealogists as a tool to trace their maternal ancestry.  It is also a great way to help others!  I Someone might be desperately researching their maternal line and need a hand.  The regular price for the mtDNA Plus kit is $69.  I am considering buying one for someone who can show me they are also descended from Sarah Evans (married to William Brummet) through a direct female line.  

This awesome new blog by a Family Tree DNA employee tells it well:

“Also technically speaking, mtDNA is the black sheep of genetic genealogy. It’s sort of like that friend you had when you were a kid that you didn’t really like but kept around because their parents had a lot of money. mtDNA is important, but not necessarily fun.

Now here’s the part where I advocate for mtDNA testing after such a supportive prologue. In all honesty, it’s sometimes necessary. Do you want to confirm your deep, direct maternal line Native American ancestry? Autosomal DNA can’t help, as it only deals with recent ancestry (we’ll get into autosomal testing soon). mtDNA testing is the only test that can possibly help in this quest if, say, your mother’s mother’s mother’s mother was Native American and inherited that from her mother. Do you want to confirm a relationship with another individual with whom you share direct maternal ancestry, and the other individual doesn’t have autosomal DNA results? mtDNA is the way to go. Would you like a rough idea of likely recent maternal countries of origin? mtDNA is your test! Are you a masochist that thrives off of pain, sweat, and sleeplessness derived from genealogical brick walls and want a test as anger fuel? mtDNA is the only way to go.” Jeremy Balkin, Breaking Genetics

Also, if you are a customer with 23andMe, please respond to messages!  Even if you don’t know what the person is talking about, just tell the inquirer so.

I actually sent a message to the last V7 match two years ago, I just also sent him a more recent message 6 months ago. None of these matches have responded.
I actually sent a message to the last V7 match two years ago, I just also sent him a more recent message 6 months ago. None of these matches have responded.