Genealogy, Uncategorized

Ortega House Santa Fe NM Trip 2018

A while back I was contacted by the current owners of Dionicio Ortega and Sarah Jane Taylor’s adobe Pueblo house.  We had a Santa Fe trip planned months ago, so I asked them if we could stop by while we where visiting the city and they accepted.

The current owners have done extensive research on their property which revealed that the Ortegas owned much of the surrounding property and that it was later divided among Dionicio and Sarah Jane’s children.

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Dionicio Ortega and Sarah Jane Taylor House, original (or near-original) floors and ceilings. Mr. Current Owner told me he did a little digging when they were fixing the place up and found “a lime-coated floor, and that was probably what was there when Sarah Jane and Dionicio moved in. They may have later put in the wood planks that are still there because they are very old. Two inches beneath the lime floor was another floor made of animal blood mixed with dirt, which makes for a linoleum-like surface.” (see linked post, “The House They Lived In”) Little Guy is clearly jazzed to stand on the floors where his ancestors once stood.
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Mr. C.O. described how this, the original house consisting of a small living/dining area, had only one window. They hired people familiar with the old Pueblo homes to cut (saw, that’s the motion he’s making) new windows out of the thick adobe walls.
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This room with the tiny door (they were all tiny doors!) was originally the stable. As we know, Dionicio was a muleteer and kept a few mules here. When the owners were doing renovations, they discovered a donkey jaw bone and various other small bones in the walls. The stepping stone outside the door (which was then an exterior door) was actually the overturned headstone of New Mexico’s first attorney general, Hugh N. Smith. Apparently when the old cemetery was demolished people salvaged the stones for use in their homes.  My husband and Mr. C.O. pictured here.
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Said headstone of New Mexico’s first attorney general Hugh N. Smith. At first I was embarrassed, but then again, the Ortegas wasted nothing. The C.O.s decided to keep it and turn it the correct side up. This wing of the house is a new addition by the C.O.s It is lovely.
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My family and I in front of the original house. Dionicio and Sarah Jane’s children added on later, as did the current owners. The surrounding properties once belonged to this Ortega family but are now owned by other people. It was a large tract of land!
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The current owners. They are very nice and have taken wonderful care of the house. I am so grateful they gave me the opportunity to show the house to my Little Guy!  Thank you so much C.O.s!

We like to visit Rosario Cemetery when we go.

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Visiting Sarah Jane Taylor, my 3rd great grandmother, Little Guy’s 4th great grandmother. We confirmed with the office staff that Dionicio is buried in the same cemetery but even they don’t know where he is buried further than the “old cemetery”.
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Little Guy found Beatrice Ortega Taylor’s grave 1896-1922. She married Alejandro Shoemaker, son of Sheriff Shoemaker, who was excited about a new gun he’d received and went home to show his young wife. According to the article in the local paper, the gun went off and hit her; she died a couple of days later. She was 26 years old.

We again didn’t make it to Santa Fe’s National Cemetery adjacent to Rosario Cemetery which is a shame, especially considering today is Memorial Day.

Next time we will visit my 4th great grandfather there, Ruperto Armijo, who was part of the 2nd New Mexico Regiment Infantry during the Civil War.

We also visited St. Francis of Assisi, Cross of the Martyrs, Fort Marcy Park, the public library, the Palace of the Governors Museum Shop to buy books, and Meow Wolf while we were there this time. I highly recommend Meow Wolf.

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Musical Mammoth at Meow Wolf
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Little Guy and I at St. Francis Cathedral. Off the top of my head my second great grandparents Luciano Romero and Salomé Montoya were married there 27 Nov 1886, and the ill-fated Beatrice Ortega Taylor de Shoemaker on April 28, 1916.
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Reading Room at the Santa Fe Public Library near Governors’ Plaza.

Looking forward to our next visit!

Genealogy

Uncle C. Sauceda’s Genetic Communities

My uncle appears as a closer match to cousins from the Sauceda and Garza side of the family than my mother does, so I decided to focus on his genetic communities instead of hers.  I think Ancestry did very well with this feature.

C Sauceda Settlers of Central and South New Mexico
“Since the 1700s, New Mexico has been shaped by the clash and co-mingling of people and cultures. Native Pueblo peoples and Spanish settlers shared similar farming techniques and joined in defense against raiding Apache and Comanche bands—with whom they also traded. War, railroads, and homesteading brought Anglo settlers, who sometimes married into Hispanic families and sometimes encroached on traditional lands. Together they faced the changes drought, boom and bust, and war brought to a harsh and beautiful land.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Those who answered Spain’s call to settle the Texas frontier were brave, determined, and incredibly resilient. For more than 100 years, they fended for themselves taming wild horses, raising livestock, and defending themselves against raiders, unpredictable weather, and the indifference of their government. When Texas joined the United States, Mexican and Anglo American settlers came together, creating the vibrant, rich culture that still distinguishes the area today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Tamaulipas Nuevo Leon and South TX
“Fiercely independent, for generations the people of the Rio Grande Valley demonstrated a determination to not only survive a brutal and unforgiving land, but thrive in danger, instability, and war. Decades of conflict created a legacy of strength in the face of opposition and dedication to their land, families, and heritage. Their descendants carried this legacy with them as they migrated north throughout the 20th century, adding it to the rich fusion of Tejano culture that still distinguishes the borderlands today.”

 

C Sauceda Mexicans in Nuevo Leon North Tamaulipas and South Texas
“Mexicans in Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas and South Texas were known for their fierce independence, persistence, and courage. They were instrumental in winning independence from Spain. And as history transformed their home from the Spanish frontier to the Mexican border (and even the United States), they came to embody the merging and clashing of Anglo and Mexican lifestyles on the border and in Texas Tejano culture.”
Genealogy

CS_DNA AncestryDNA

My maternal uncle agreed to take an AncestryDNA test for me and it was just received by Ancestry yesterday.  The website notes that lab processing times have increased.

He is under the username CS_DNA (always google interesting matches, it’s worth a shot) and I don’t plan on filling out the tree.  His tree is the same as my mom’s “Sauceda Romero Family Tree” since they are full siblings and the link to her tree is included in his profile, anyone looking at his profile will be able to pull it up.  You can also see my tab at the top of the page “Maternal Family Tree”. When I started having family members test at Ancestry I didn’t realize you could administer multiple tests from one user account so I had a bunch of separate accounts that I have access to.

I am glad to have another child of my maternal grandmother’s test with Ancestry since I didn’t think she could produce enough saliva to take their test (she was only tested with Family Tree DNA).  I will transfer his results to FTDNA where he has Y-DNA results.

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CS_DNA’s test kit received yesterday, although Ancestry hasn’t registered the fact yet. I don’t plan on filling out his family tree but the link to his full sister’s tree is in his profile.

 

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CS_DNA’s profile on Ancestry. You can copy/paste the link to his sister’s tree “Sauceda Romero Family Tree”.
Genealogy

Mom’s Shared Ancestor Hints and NADs

Because I should probably write something every once in a while.

She has 11 Shared Ancestor Hints:

  • Two share Candelario Garza Martinez and Felicitas Cantú
    • Candelario Garza Martinez born about 1834 in Santiago, Nuevo León, Mexico to Froilan de la Garza and Rita Martinez
    • We don’t know when or where Felicitas Cantú was born, but the couple ended up in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico as seen on my ancestor Francisca Garza’s baptism record.
    • One match is a known cousin, the other through the couple’s daughter, Candelaria Garza.
  • Three share Maria Guadalupe Martín, and only Maria Guadalupe Martín because each is listed with a different husband and children.
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In our tree: This is from the book New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 published by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.  It shows Manuel Urioste’s wife Maria Guadalupe Martín has died so he goes on to marry Maria Felipe Montoya.  Manuel Urioste and Maria Guadalupe Martín’s sons Feliz Urioste and Aniceto Urioste were the witnesses.

New Mexico Marriages, Santa Fe, St. Francis Church/Cathedral January 1858 to October 1889 a publication by the Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico 2002.

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My son and I in front of St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 2016
  • FINALLY one descendant of William Brummet and Sarah Evans through their daughter Susan Frances Brummitt.
    • Susan Frances Brummitt was born 1836 in Grundy County, Missouri and married John William Karr in 1857.
  • Two share Juan Ygnacio Armijo and Maria Eulalia Sandoval
    • We don’t know where Juan Ygnacio Armijo or Maria Eulalia Sandoval were born, but their son (our ancestor) Ruperto Armijo was born in 1826 in Pena Blanca, Sandoval County, New Mexico.
    • One match is through their son Antonio Armijo born about 1834, the other is through their daughter Maria Estefanita Armijo born about 1822.
  • The last three have private trees so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mom is up to three New Ancestor Discoveries who I thought maybe could bee in-laws but so far I haven’t been able to place them.

  • Richard Scott and Rebecca Ann Cooper
    • Richard Scott was born in 1807 in Virginia.
    • He married Rebecca Ann Cooper in Virginia 1838.
  • James Harris born about 1811 in Bedford County, Virginia [ Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 on Ancestry]

mom-nads